Alan Alda received a scary diagnosis but he‘s choosing to face it with courage and service.

To an entire generation, he was “Hawkeye,” the peace-loving soldier on “M*A*S*H."

But the 82-year-old actor is creating a new legacy for himself as he opens up about living with Parkinson’s disease.


During an interview on July 31, Alda revealed he was diagnosed three years ago. “I think because I'm sort of well-known, it might be helpful to people to hear the message that there are things you can do,” he said. “You can learn about things and not follow quackery, but find out what real science is coming up with. That helps.”

He knew the story would come out but he’s choosing to define the narrative.

Alda has continued to act since his diagnosis, deciding when to reveal the news publicly.

“I could see my thumb twitch in some shots, and I thought, ‘it's probably only a matter of time before somebody does a story about this from a sad point of view,‘ but that's not where I am," he said. “I've had a richer life than I've had up until now."

"This is not to short change people who are suffering with real severe symptoms," he added. But for those who can still remain active, Alda is letting people know they are not alone and even offering some of delightful — and impressive — tips for staying active.

"I'm taking boxing lessons three times a week,” he said. “I do singles tennis a couple of times a week. I march to Sousa music because marching to music is good for Parkinson's."

Photo by Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images.

Not surprisingly, Alda hasn’t stopped entertaining and informing audiences around the globe. He hosts a podcast on communication and used to host a long-running show on science.

Now, he’s taking the stage in an act of public service to bring hope and comfort to others facing Parkinson’s disease — and that’s a role worth celebrating.

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Emily Calandrelli was stopped by TSA agents when she tried to bring her ice packs for pumped milk through airport security.

Traveling without your baby for the first time can be tough. And if you're breastfeeding, it can be even tougher, as you have to pump milk every few hours to keep your body producing enough, to avoid an enormous amount of discomfort and to prevent risk of infection.

But for Emily Calandrelli, taking a recent work trip away from her 10-week-old son was far more challenging than it needed to be.

Calandrelli is a mom of two, an aerospace engineer and the host of the Netflix kids' science show "Emily's Wonder Lab." She was recently taking her first work trip since welcoming her second child, which included a five-hour flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. Calandrelli is breastfeeding her son and had planned to pump just before boarding the plane. She brought ice packs to keep the milk from spoiling during the flight, but when she tried to go through airport security, the TSA agents refused to let her take some of her supplies.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Yuri has a very important message for his co-workers.

While every person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is different, there are some common communication traits that everyone should understand. Many with ASD process language literally and have a hard time understanding body language, social cues, exaggeration and cultural cues.

This can lead to misunderstandings that result in people with ASD appearing to be rude when it wasn't their intent. If more neurotypical people (those without ASD) better understood these communication differences, it’d be much easier for everyone to get along.

A perfect example of this problem and how to fix it was shared by Yuri, a transmasc person who goes by he/they, who posts on TikTok about having ADHD and ASD. In a post that has more than 2.3 million views, Yuri claims he was “booked for a disciplinary meeting for being a bad communicator.”

Keep Reading Show less