Heroes

After 70 Seconds Of Stuff We Don’t Know, This Gets So Deep I Don’t Know What To Do With Myself

Sure, at first it's all random thoughts about our dumbness, but then he drops something so profound that it could change what someone thinks about how to live life.

After 70 Seconds Of Stuff We Don’t Know, This Gets So Deep I Don’t Know What To Do With Myself

"He" is John Lloyd, and he's a producer and creator of lots of beloved British comedies.

He starts with a simple but weird question:

What are the things we don't know?


Well, putting aside, um, like 96% of everything for a minute, he's got a list of three biggies.

Big Thing We Don't Understand #1: Consciousness.

Hm, what is that pesky thing anyway? Good thing we don't have to touch it. Ew.

Big Thing We Don't Understand #2: Gravity.

We know some things about atoms and such, but do we have a clue what makes gravity work? Nope.

Big Thing We Don't Understand #3: Explosions.

We don't really know what makes them happen. (Maybe it's consciousness, ahem.)

Big Thing We Don't Understand #4: Comedy.

OK, this is getting personal. Lloyd's created some very funny stuff (like "Blackadder") and even he doesn't know what makes anyone laugh. (That's him with the rubber nose, btw.)

But he says this is all cool because "ignorance drives science."

"Any fool can find answers. People who ask new questions, they're the geniuses." — John Lloyd

If "ignorance is at the heart of any new kind of discovery," as he says, maybe you don't really need to know much.

Lloyd reckons the trick is figuring out what you do need to know.

So we might stop investing so much in arguments about things we can't really know while we're letting really important things in our own lives go by unnoticed.

What use is being smart if you don't use it intelligently?

And then, boom. There it is. Here's what's smart:

Kindness.

Kindness is always better than almost anything. And we all know it, even if we'd rather not admit it to our insecure — OK, selfish — selves sometimes.

Lloyd suggests it's worth getting over that hesitation and doing what we know to be right. It's "extraordinarily powerful," sez him.

Because:

The video makes all of this just plain impossible to argue with. Enjoy.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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