A smart dude takes on racism with facts. Not wild accusations. Facts. And I'm begging you to listen.

Don't think racism in the United States is an issue? Then, I'm sure John Green will make you think again:

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Let's talk about just a few of the examples Green mentions, starting with the criminal justice system. First off, most white people don't even think there's a problem.


But black people serve longer sentences than whites when convicted of the same crime.

They are also punished more harshly when it comes to drugs.

In the job market, black people are discriminated against just on the basis of their name.

And unsurprisingly, minorities get worse health care.

I could go on (and Green does), but the bottom line here is that claims of systemic racism are clearly backed up by data.

However, it's not just the numbers we should be concerned about. We have to listen and honor the voices of those who have stories to tell.

Well said, John Green. Well said.

via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

But loneliness doesn't just affect those who reside by themselves. People can feel lonely when there is a discrepancy between their desired and actual relationships. To put it simply, when it comes to having a healthy social life, quality is just as important as quantity.

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