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A fitness blogger posted a viral video after he abused her. Most people would never have known.

I guarantee that what she's describing is happening to many others, possibly on your block.

A fitness blogger posted a viral video after he abused her. Most people would never have known.

A woman with an abusive partner bravely shares her story.

Emma Murphy is a fitness blogger in Dublin. She's a mom of two and recently has struggled with the discovery that her partner is abusive. That's a gut-wrenching truth many women and men don't want to fully face when they learn it about their partners.

After the most recent attack, she made a brave decision. She posted a video discussing her process coming to terms with it. It's clear from the bruising that she's been physically harmed. Though that's hard to stomach, the most useful part of this video is how she describes the ups and downs.


"I thought long and hard before posting this video, this is very difficult for me but I have to do what is RIGHT, if you or anyone you know has it is in a similar situation please share this video to inspire other women around the world, violence is NOT the answer!!!!"
— Posted to Facebook by Emma Murphy on July 6, 2015

The story doesn't have a happy ending YET, but it can. Emma's in the throes of what will likely be the most difficult time in her life. Her statement took courage, but so will the rest of what she is about to face.

Here are some important things to know and try to make a safety plan for when leaving an abuser:

  • Abuse victims are often in the most danger when they leave or after they leave.

Source: Domestic Violence Intervention Program.

  • A victim often returns to their abuser more than once before they can really get away for good.

Source: Domestic Abuse Shelter of the Florida Keys.

  • An abused person, if they can get away for good and survive the process, subsequently faces the most gargantuan task of all: rebuilding their life and healing the emotional wounds they will carry.

Source: Psychology Today.

But they can do it. They can succeed. They can have a full life.

Thousands do it every day. People whose names you will never know. People whose stories you may never hear. People who have heroically rebuilt their lives - and may be living right next door to you. But just in case you need some famous reminders, here are a few:

Rihanna

Photo by Liam Mendes/Wikimedia Commons.

Madonna

Photo by David Shankbone/Wikimedia Commons.

Tina Turner

Photo by Heinrich Klaffs/Flickr.

Meredith Vieira

Photo by Daniel Flather/Creative Commons.

Evan Peters

Photo by Rum1103/Wikimedia Commons.

Halle Berry

Photo by Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons.

Lionel Richie


Photo by DianeSunshineCoast/Wikimedia Commons.

And I hope the same for Emma Murphy and her children. She has hundreds of thousands of people cheering her. With the right planning, precautions, and self-care, she has a real chance.

Everyone has the right to an abuse-free household.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.