31 powerful photos from the massive, awe-inspiring March for Our Lives.

On March 24, 2018, people around the world took to the streets to protest gun violence with the March for Our Lives.

Scheduled in response to the Feb. 14 school shooting in Parkland, Florida, the March for Our Lives descended on the nation's capital — in addition to smaller marches around the country — with people voicing support for gun safety measures like universal background checks and a ban on certain semi-automatic rifles.

From the signs to the sheer number of people in attendance, the demonstrations were simply stunning on a visual level.


Washington, D.C.

Sign-holding marchers fill the streets in Washington, D.C. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

People bear messages on uprisen hands in Washington, D.C. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

There were performances by artists like Common, Demi Lovato, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Ben Platt, Vic Mensa, Miley Cyrus, and Ariana Grande.

Common performs "Stand Up for Something" with members of the Cardinal Shehan School choir. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Demi Lovato sings in Washington, D.C. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and Ben Platt take the mics at the Washington D.C. March for Our Lives rally. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Rapper Vic Mensa performs at the rally in D.C. Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

Miley Cyrus belts out "The Climb" during the March for Our Lives rally. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Ariana Grande sings at the D.C. rally. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

The crowd was absolutely massive.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Of course, students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and others from around the country, delivered impassioned speeches to a roaring crowd.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Delaney Tarr speaks. Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Student Cameron Kasky addresses the crowd. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student David Hogg raises a fist at the rally. Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

Alexandria, Virginia, student Naomi Wadler speaks during the D.C. rally. Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

The demonstration weren't only in D.C. Marches and rallies popped up around the world in support of the March for Our Lives.

In the U.S., there were more than 800 rallies scheduled with a simple goal: to care more about our children than we care about our guns.

New York City, New York

A crowd unites with signs such as "Are our kids' lives worth your guns?" Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Paul McCartney joins the New York march wearing a shirt that says "We Can End Gun Violence." Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Protesters demand gun regulations in N.Y. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images.

Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images.

Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images.

Los Angeles, California

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Pflugerville, Texas

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

Berlin, Germany

Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images.

Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images.

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

London, England

Photo by Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images.

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Photo by Koen Van Weel/AFP/Getty Images.

Read more on the March for Our Lives with stories on Parkland student Emma Gonzalez’s emotional silence, D.C. student Zion Kelly’s speech on losing his twin to gun violence, outstanding protest signs, and moving words from little kids.

And if you want to support the anti-gun-violence movement, we have a quiz for the best way you can help.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

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