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Private jets.

Oh. Yes. Photo by Matt Mordfin/Flickr.


The most baller way to travel since that thing where four dudes carry you on a tiny wicker couch.

Straight chillin'. Photo by Cambridge and Company/Wikimedia Commons.

Like many CEOs, Tim Boyle, head of Columbia Sportswear Company, has one.

Not him, but we didn't have a photo, so we assume this is close enough. Photo via iStock.

And the other day, he lent his jet out for a great cause.

On Aug. 21, 2015, Americans Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos, and Spencer Stone helped subdue a gunman who was seconds away from, potentially, massacring dozens on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

Photo by Laurent Viteur/Getty Images.

For their heroism, France decided to award Stone, Skarlatos, and Sadler its highest honor: the Legion d'Honneur.

The problem was, their moms wanted to be there on the big day.

Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images.

But they had no way to get to Paris in time for the ceremony.

Enter Boyle...

Not him again. Photo via iStock.

...who, at the request of his pilot, lent the moms his private jet.

As first reported by Allan Brettman of The Oregonian:

Tim Boyle's pilot called at 9 pm Saturday with a special request.

The mothers of the three Americans who thwarted a would-be terrorist aboard a Netherlands-France bullet train had been invited to attend a ceremony in Paris honoring their sons. But they had no way to get there.

"Would we be willing to fly them in our plane to Paris?" asked pilot Doug Perrill.

"Yeah, we'd be happy to do that," replied Boyle

, chief executive of outdoor gear company Columbia Sportswear in Washington County.



A move so awesome, it requires three separate hats off.

Hats off to Tim Boyle.

Still not him, but he probably owns this coat. Photo by US CPSC/Wikimedia Commons.

Dude doesn't just make solid coats, he's also, obviously, got a pretty good handle on the right thing to do for some now-very-happy moms.

Hats off to Doug Perrill, Tim Boyle's pilot.

It takes guts to ask your boss for a favor like that. I have a hard time asking mine to borrow her stapler. Asking to lend out the jet for a few days ... goes a few steps beyond that. Kudos to Perrill for speaking up and getting the ball rolling.

Last, but not least, hats off to the three Americans who helped stop what might have been yet another senseless shooting.

Not only are you getting the recognition you deserve, thanks to a generous CEO and his big-hearted pilot, your moms are flying to witness it...

Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/Getty Images.

...in appropriately baller style.

Photo by JetRequest.com/Wikimedia Commons.

Make sure they Instagram the whole thing, 'kay?

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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gerlalt/Canva

James Earl Jones helped "Sesame Street" prove its pedagogical model for teaching kids the alphabet.

James Earl Jones has one of the most recognizable voices in the entertainment industry and has for decades. Most of us probably heard that deep, resonant voice first as Darth Vader in "Star Wars," or perhaps Mufasa in "The Lion King," but just one or two words are enough to say, "Oh, that's definitely James Earl Jones."

Jones has been acting on stage and in film since the 1960s. He also has the distinction of being the first celebrity guest to be invited to "Sesame Street" during the show's debut season in 1969.

According to Muppet Wiki, clips of Jones counting to 10 and reciting the alphabet were included in unbroadcast pilot episodes and also included in one of the first official television episodes. Funnily enough, Jones originally didn't think the show would last, as he thought kids would be terrified of the muppets. Clearly, that turned out not to be the case.

Jones' alphabet recitation served as a test for the "Sesame Street" pedagogical model, which was meant to inspire interaction from kids rather than just passive absorption. Though to the untrained eye, Jones' slow recitation of the ABCs may seem either plodding or bizarrely hypnotic, there's a purpose to the way it's presented.

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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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