More

3 moms had no way to fly to see their hero sons honored. So a CEO lent them his private jet.

For him, it was a small gesture. For them, it meant everything.

Private jets.

Oh. Yes. Photo by Matt Mordfin/Flickr.


The most baller way to travel since that thing where four dudes carry you on a tiny wicker couch.

Straight chillin'. Photo by Cambridge and Company/Wikimedia Commons.

Like many CEOs, Tim Boyle, head of Columbia Sportswear Company, has one.

Not him, but we didn't have a photo, so we assume this is close enough. Photo via iStock.

And the other day, he lent his jet out for a great cause.

On Aug. 21, 2015, Americans Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos, and Spencer Stone helped subdue a gunman who was seconds away from, potentially, massacring dozens on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

Photo by Laurent Viteur/Getty Images.

For their heroism, France decided to award Stone, Skarlatos, and Sadler its highest honor: the Legion d'Honneur.

The problem was, their moms wanted to be there on the big day.

Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images.

But they had no way to get to Paris in time for the ceremony.

Enter Boyle...

Not him again. Photo via iStock.

...who, at the request of his pilot, lent the moms his private jet.

As first reported by Allan Brettman of The Oregonian:

Tim Boyle's pilot called at 9 pm Saturday with a special request.

The mothers of the three Americans who thwarted a would-be terrorist aboard a Netherlands-France bullet train had been invited to attend a ceremony in Paris honoring their sons. But they had no way to get there.

"Would we be willing to fly them in our plane to Paris?" asked pilot Doug Perrill.

"Yeah, we'd be happy to do that," replied Boyle

, chief executive of outdoor gear company Columbia Sportswear in Washington County.



A move so awesome, it requires three separate hats off.

Hats off to Tim Boyle.

Still not him, but he probably owns this coat. Photo by US CPSC/Wikimedia Commons.

Dude doesn't just make solid coats, he's also, obviously, got a pretty good handle on the right thing to do for some now-very-happy moms.

Hats off to Doug Perrill, Tim Boyle's pilot.

It takes guts to ask your boss for a favor like that. I have a hard time asking mine to borrow her stapler. Asking to lend out the jet for a few days ... goes a few steps beyond that. Kudos to Perrill for speaking up and getting the ball rolling.

Last, but not least, hats off to the three Americans who helped stop what might have been yet another senseless shooting.

Not only are you getting the recognition you deserve, thanks to a generous CEO and his big-hearted pilot, your moms are flying to witness it...

Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/Getty Images.

...in appropriately baller style.

Photo by JetRequest.com/Wikimedia Commons.

Make sure they Instagram the whole thing, 'kay?

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Emily Calandrelli was stopped by TSA agents when she tried to bring her ice packs for pumped milk through airport security.

Traveling without your baby for the first time can be tough. And if you're breastfeeding, it can be even tougher, as you have to pump milk every few hours to keep your body producing enough, to avoid an enormous amount of discomfort and to prevent risk of infection.

But for Emily Calandrelli, taking a recent work trip away from her 10-week-old son was far more challenging than it needed to be.

Calandrelli is a mom of two, an aerospace engineer and the host of the Netflix kids' science show "Emily's Wonder Lab." She was recently taking her first work trip since welcoming her second child, which included a five-hour flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. Calandrelli is breastfeeding her son and had planned to pump just before boarding the plane. She brought ice packs to keep the milk from spoiling during the flight, but when she tried to go through airport security, the TSA agents refused to let her take some of her supplies.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Yuri has a very important message for his co-workers.

While every person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is different, there are some common communication traits that everyone should understand. Many with ASD process language literally and have a hard time understanding body language, social cues, exaggeration and cultural cues.

This can lead to misunderstandings that result in people with ASD appearing to be rude when it wasn't their intent. If more neurotypical people (those without ASD) better understood these communication differences, it’d be much easier for everyone to get along.

A perfect example of this problem and how to fix it was shared by Yuri, a transmasc person who goes by he/they, who posts on TikTok about having ADHD and ASD. In a post that has more than 2.3 million views, Yuri claims he was “booked for a disciplinary meeting for being a bad communicator.”

Keep Reading Show less