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3 moms had no way to fly to see their hero sons honored. So a CEO lent them his private jet.

For him, it was a small gesture. For them, it meant everything.

3 moms had no way to fly to see their hero sons honored. So a CEO lent them his private jet.

Private jets.

Oh. Yes. Photo by Matt Mordfin/Flickr.


The most baller way to travel since that thing where four dudes carry you on a tiny wicker couch.

Straight chillin'. Photo by Cambridge and Company/Wikimedia Commons.

Like many CEOs, Tim Boyle, head of Columbia Sportswear Company, has one.

Not him, but we didn't have a photo, so we assume this is close enough. Photo via iStock.

And the other day, he lent his jet out for a great cause.

On Aug. 21, 2015, Americans Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos, and Spencer Stone helped subdue a gunman who was seconds away from, potentially, massacring dozens on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

Photo by Laurent Viteur/Getty Images.

For their heroism, France decided to award Stone, Skarlatos, and Sadler its highest honor: the Legion d'Honneur.

The problem was, their moms wanted to be there on the big day.

Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images.

But they had no way to get to Paris in time for the ceremony.

Enter Boyle...

Not him again. Photo via iStock.

...who, at the request of his pilot, lent the moms his private jet.

As first reported by Allan Brettman of The Oregonian:

Tim Boyle's pilot called at 9 pm Saturday with a special request.

The mothers of the three Americans who thwarted a would-be terrorist aboard a Netherlands-France bullet train had been invited to attend a ceremony in Paris honoring their sons. But they had no way to get there.

"Would we be willing to fly them in our plane to Paris?" asked pilot Doug Perrill.

"Yeah, we'd be happy to do that," replied Boyle

, chief executive of outdoor gear company Columbia Sportswear in Washington County.



A move so awesome, it requires three separate hats off.

Hats off to Tim Boyle.

Still not him, but he probably owns this coat. Photo by US CPSC/Wikimedia Commons.

Dude doesn't just make solid coats, he's also, obviously, got a pretty good handle on the right thing to do for some now-very-happy moms.

Hats off to Doug Perrill, Tim Boyle's pilot.

It takes guts to ask your boss for a favor like that. I have a hard time asking mine to borrow her stapler. Asking to lend out the jet for a few days ... goes a few steps beyond that. Kudos to Perrill for speaking up and getting the ball rolling.

Last, but not least, hats off to the three Americans who helped stop what might have been yet another senseless shooting.

Not only are you getting the recognition you deserve, thanks to a generous CEO and his big-hearted pilot, your moms are flying to witness it...

Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/Getty Images.

...in appropriately baller style.

Photo by JetRequest.com/Wikimedia Commons.

Make sure they Instagram the whole thing, 'kay?

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.