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3 moms had no way to fly to see their hero sons honored. So a CEO lent them his private jet.

For him, it was a small gesture. For them, it meant everything.

3 moms had no way to fly to see their hero sons honored. So a CEO lent them his private jet.

Private jets.

Oh. Yes. Photo by Matt Mordfin/Flickr.


The most baller way to travel since that thing where four dudes carry you on a tiny wicker couch.

Straight chillin'. Photo by Cambridge and Company/Wikimedia Commons.

Like many CEOs, Tim Boyle, head of Columbia Sportswear Company, has one.

Not him, but we didn't have a photo, so we assume this is close enough. Photo via iStock.

And the other day, he lent his jet out for a great cause.

On Aug. 21, 2015, Americans Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos, and Spencer Stone helped subdue a gunman who was seconds away from, potentially, massacring dozens on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

Photo by Laurent Viteur/Getty Images.

For their heroism, France decided to award Stone, Skarlatos, and Sadler its highest honor: the Legion d'Honneur.

The problem was, their moms wanted to be there on the big day.

Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images.

But they had no way to get to Paris in time for the ceremony.

Enter Boyle...

Not him again. Photo via iStock.

...who, at the request of his pilot, lent the moms his private jet.

As first reported by Allan Brettman of The Oregonian:

Tim Boyle's pilot called at 9 pm Saturday with a special request.

The mothers of the three Americans who thwarted a would-be terrorist aboard a Netherlands-France bullet train had been invited to attend a ceremony in Paris honoring their sons. But they had no way to get there.

"Would we be willing to fly them in our plane to Paris?" asked pilot Doug Perrill.

"Yeah, we'd be happy to do that," replied Boyle

, chief executive of outdoor gear company Columbia Sportswear in Washington County.



A move so awesome, it requires three separate hats off.

Hats off to Tim Boyle.

Still not him, but he probably owns this coat. Photo by US CPSC/Wikimedia Commons.

Dude doesn't just make solid coats, he's also, obviously, got a pretty good handle on the right thing to do for some now-very-happy moms.

Hats off to Doug Perrill, Tim Boyle's pilot.

It takes guts to ask your boss for a favor like that. I have a hard time asking mine to borrow her stapler. Asking to lend out the jet for a few days ... goes a few steps beyond that. Kudos to Perrill for speaking up and getting the ball rolling.

Last, but not least, hats off to the three Americans who helped stop what might have been yet another senseless shooting.

Not only are you getting the recognition you deserve, thanks to a generous CEO and his big-hearted pilot, your moms are flying to witness it...

Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/Getty Images.

...in appropriately baller style.

Photo by JetRequest.com/Wikimedia Commons.

Make sure they Instagram the whole thing, 'kay?

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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