+
Family

27 tips to help you thrift shop like a boss this summer season.

Save some cash, save the planet, and dig for some hidden thrift shop treasures.

True
Savers + Value Village

Summer is finally here! (Well, almost.)

As the weather heats up, we’re drawn to brighter colors and lighter fabrics — cue your desire for a complete closet refresh. It's tempting to invest in an entirely new wardrobe to match the coming season, but fashion can come with a hefty price — both for your wallet and the environment. Did you know that it can take up to 1,800 gallons of water to make a single pair of jeans? 1,800 gallons!

This year, instead of heading straight for the mall or diving into the abyss that is online shopping, consider checking out your local thrift store for all your summer fun needs — from poolside lounging to graduation parties or weddings. Thrifting can be a great way to save money (and the planet) while prepping for summer.


Like anything, thrifting can be an art. We're here with some tips and tricks to help you get your thrift on this summer.

Before you go:

1. Grab clothing and accessories from your own closet that you no longer need and are ready to recycle. Make room for those new finds and donate to local charitable organizations while you're at it.

2. Get on the mailing list or join the store's loyalty program. Research what days have deals for certain items — up to 50% off, or buy one get one free. You might even be able to get a discount on your birthday.

Image via iStock.

3. Set a budget. It'll help you stay focused on items you actually need. Even a small budget can get you quite a haul at stores like Savers, where nearly 95% of the items sold are under $10.

4. Bring a friend. You'll cover more ground in the store and have someone there to give an opinion on your more peculiar finds.

5. Looking for something vintage? Check out these tips on snagging awesome vintage finds (for instance, did you know that metal zippers and side-snap closures are a sign that something was made before the mid-60s?)

6. Wear something that you can try things on over — like a tank top — so you skip the dressing-room lines.

7. Brainstorm a list of five items you're looking for. If nothing else, this will give you a place to start when you get there. But...

8. Be adaptable, the best part of thrifting is an unexpected find.

When you get there:

9. Think outside your own box. Keep friends and family in mind: a friend who's a different size than you are or a niece who needs a new book for summer break.

10. Give yourself some extra time in the store — hunting for hidden treasures takes time.

Shopping for clothes:

11. Don't limit yourself to your typical size. Sizes vary so much by brand and era; it's worth looking through at least four sizes smaller and larger than your usual.

12. Plan to try on your items before you buy.

13. In the summer months, keep an eye out for seasonal finds: sun hats and swimsuits and flip-flops — oh my. Stock up on the essentials.

14. Don't be intimidated by the shoe section: high quality, barely used shoes at a huge discount. Check the soles for wear.

Getting crafty:

15. Even if you aren't a craft expert, you can probably sew a button back on, hem a dress, or cut out some shoulder pads. Or you can visit your local tailor.

16. Looking for jorts (jean shorts) this summer? Find a pair of jeans with a bit more room in the thigh, cut off the legs, and roll the hems for some quick, super-comfy new shorts.

Image via iStock.

Shopping for knickknacks and housewares:

17. Check out the housewares section for seasonal party decorations. Lemonade pitchers, margarita glasses, and festive dishes galore.

18. Keep an eye out for gardening supplies — it's never too late in the summer season to plant some flowers.

19. In books, you'll find great reads for your next beach vacation, including current best-selling paperback fiction. Why spend full price?

20. Recipe books too. Nothing beats perusing through a hard copy of "Grilling for Dummies" or "50 Easy Frozen Yogurt Recipes."

Image via iStock.

21. Looking for a complete set of dishes? You'll find matching plates, mugs, bowls, and more in any thrift shop.

22. Keep an eye out for cast iron pans — with just a little love, even pans that look pretty beat up can be good as new.

23. The kitchen appliance section might surprise you — cake-pop makers, cordless wine chillers, donut makers, milk frothers, juicers, and so much more.

Before you check out:

24. Look for an outlet (or ask an employee) to test your new appliance before you buy it.

25. Didn't find what you were looking for? Try again tomorrow — seriously. Thrift shops like Savers put out up to 10,000 new items at each store every day.

On Fridays, we go thrifting. What will you be hunting for this weekend? cc: @meg_swellvtg #Savers #findthefind #regram

A post shared by Savers Thrift Store (@savers_thrift) on

26. Or try thrifting in a new area. Each store is unique, so it's worth trying the location on the other side of town or wherever you happen to be vacationing.

27. Have fun. It's a no-brainer, but an important reminder.

Thrifting is a win-win-win for your wallet, the Earth, and your community.

According to the Savers 2017 State of Reuse Report, over 6 in 10 people said they shopped thrift in 2016. As more people choose a thrifted tee instead of a new one, over time, this can help reduce resource waste — like thousands of gallons of water to create that new tee or a pair of jeans.

See you in the aisles!

All illustrations are provided by Soosh and used with permission.

I have plenty of space.

This article originally appeared on 04.09.16


It's hard to truly describe the amazing bond between dads and their daughters.

Being a dad is an amazing job no matter the gender of the tiny humans we're raising. But there's something unique about the bond between fathers and daughters.

Most dads know what it's like to struggle with braiding hair, but we also know that bonding time provides immense value to our daughters. In fact, studies have shown that women with actively involved fathers are more confident and more successful in school and business.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

This blind chef wore a body cam to show how she prepares dazzling dishes.

How do blind people cook? This "Masterchef" winner leans into her senses.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Christine Ha competes on "Masterchef."

This article originally appeared on 05.26.17


There is one question chef Christine Ha fields more than any other.

But it's got nothing to do with being a "Masterchef" champion, New York Times bestselling author, and acclaimed TV host and cooking instructor.

The question: "How do you cook while blind?"

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Two couples move in together with their kids to create one big, loving 'polyfamory'

They are using their unique family arrangement to help people better understand polyamory.

The Hartless and Rodgers families post together


Polyamory, a lifestyle where people have multiple romantic or sexual partners, is more prevalent in America than most people think. According to a study published in Frontiers in Psychology, one in nine Americans have been in a polyamorous relationship, and one in six say they would like to try one.

However popular the idea is, polyamory is misunderstood by a large swath of the public and is often seen as deviant. However, those who practice it view polyamory as a healthy lifestyle with several benefits.

Taya Hartless, 28, and Alysia Rogers, 34, along with their husbands Sean, 46, and Tyler, 35, are in a polyamorous relationship and have no problem sharing their lifestyle with the public on social media. Even though they risk stigmatization for being open about their non-traditional relationships, they are sharing it with the world to make it a safer place for “poly” folks like themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less

Gordon Ramsay at play... work.

This article originally appeared on 04.22.15


Gordon Ramsay is not exactly known for being nice.

Or patient.

Or nurturing.

On his competition show "Hell's Kitchen," he belittles cooks who can't keep up. If people come to him with their problems, he berates them. If someone is struggling to get something right in the kitchen, he curses them out.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 01.27.20


From 1940 to 1945, an estimated 1.3 million people were deported to Auschwitz, the largest complex of Nazi concentration camps. More than four out of five of those people—at least 1.1 million people—were murdered there.

On January 27, 1945, Soviet forces liberated the final prisoners from these camps—7,000 people, most of whom were sick or dying. Those of us with a decent public education are familiar with at least a few names of Nazi extermination facilities—Auschwitz, Dachau, Bergen-Belsen—but these are merely a few of the thousands (yes, thousands) of concentration camps, sub camps, and ghettos spread across Europe where Jews and other targets of Hitler's regime were persecuted, tortured, and killed by the millions.

Keep ReadingShow less
Health

What I realized about feminism after my male friend was disgusted by tampons at a party.

"After all these years, my friend has probably forgotten, but I never have."

Photo by Josefin on Unsplash

It’s okay men. You don’t have to be afraid.

This article originally appeared on 08.12.16


Years ago, a friend went to a party, and something bothered him enough to rant to me about it later.

And it bothered me that he was so incensed about it, but I couldn't put my finger on why. It seemed so petty for him to be upset, and even more so for me to be annoyed with him.

Recently, something reminded me of that scenario, and it made more sense. I'll explain.

Keep ReadingShow less