Skip Black Friday and shop discounts at these companies making a positive impact on the world

Courtesy of DoneGood

While Thanksgiving is meant to celebrate all we have to be grateful for, it's also the unofficial kick-off to the holiday shopping season. Last year, Americans spent about $1 trillion on gifts. What if we all used that purchasing power to support companies that reduce inequality, alleviate poverty, fight climate change, and help make the world better?

Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, the coming days will have spending on everyone's brains. But in an effort to promote the companies doing good for the world, DoneGood founder Cullen Schwarz created Shop for Good Sunday (which falls on December 1 this year.)

Dubbed the "Alternate Black Friday," Shop for Good Sunday is dedicated to encouraging people to shop brands that do good for people and the planet. It also serves as a reminder to support local businesses making a positive impact in their communities.

While Shop for Good Sunday technically falls on a single day, this year, participating ethical and sustainable brands are running discounts for the whole week prior.

Where you invest your dollars matters, and there's great potential to put that money to good use if you know how. Check out these six brands that sell amazing products while also making a positive impact on the world. You'll not only be getting your loved ones meaningful gifts, but also making the world a brighter place along the way.

Isn't that what the holidays are really about?


Functional outdoor gear

Parque Rain Shell

Cotopaxi makes unique, sustainable outdoor gear, like this Parque rain shell, while keeping ethics at the core of its business model. The company gives 1% of its annual revenue to organizations that fight poverty and improve the human condition.

Modern furniture

Simbly Coffee Table

Simbly is a direct-to-consumer furniture company that sells modern, sustainable products built in the U.S. made of FSC-certified wood. And for every product sold, the company plants a tree.

Beautiful jewelry

Tho Bar & Geo Buffalo Horn Earrings

Hathorway is a jewelry company that handcrafts its accessories with materials like ethically-sourced up-cycled buffalo horns and handwoven rattan. Each item is designed and assembled in the U.S. with thoughtfully selected materials sourced from Vietnam, Thailand, and South Korea. A portion of the company's profit goes to initiatives that empower young, underprivileged women.

Luxe linens

Bamboo Charcoal Sheet Set

Ettitude crafts its home textiles from CleanBamboo fabric, a unique material made from 100% organic bamboo, the most resource-efficient plant on the planet. It also requires significantly less water to grow and produce than traditional cotton textiles. The products are also ethically made and come in packaging made from extra pieces of fabric.

Unique wood wares

The Charcuterie Board

Would Works creates and sells beautiful household wood products handcrafted by people experiencing homelessness or living in poverty. The company works with its artisans to provide job skills, financial literacy, and an income so they can reach their financial goals.

Empowering candles

She Inspires Candle

Prosperity Candle products are created by women refugees building a brighter future for themselves and their families. Each candle is made of soy-blend wax with essential oils hand poured in a well-designed container that is easily refilled or repurposed.

Find more of these great deals at DoneGood!

*Upworthy may earn a portion of sales revenue from purchases made through affiliate links on our site.

Business
via Thomas Dollinger / Twitter

Bob Dylan's new single, "Murder Most Foul" about the assassination of John F. Kennedy and its impact on America is his first to hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song is remarkable because it does a great job at documenting the history of the event while also portraying the raw emotional energy surrounding the assassination.

Dylan has written songs that went to number one for other artists, Peter, Paul and Mary's "Blowin' in the Wind" (1963) and the Byrds' "Mr. Tambourine Man" (1965). But, at the tender age of 78, this is the first in Dylan's own name.

He reached number two on the Hot 100 twice in 1965 with "Like a Rolling Stone" (1965) "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" (a.k.a "Everybody Must Get Stoned"). He hit #2 on the Adult Alternative charts in 2000 with "Things Have Changed."

Keep Reading Show less
popular

In a White House briefing last week, Dr. Deborah Birx praised the states of Washington and California for their comparatively successful efforts to "flatten the curve" in the coronavirus pandemic.

"We really do appreciate the work of the citizens of California and Washington state, because we do see that their curve is different," she said. "Their curve is different from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut — and we really believe that the work that every citizen is doing in those states is making a difference."

This video of Seattle under lockdown shows what those efforts look like. Having visited Seattle countless times, I can attest that these drone-filmed scenes are a stark and haunting contrast to the normal hustle and bustle of the city.


Keep Reading Show less
popular

The goalposts have really been moved on what one would call a vacation these days. To call something a vacation it used to require a trip on an airplane or at least a car ride of more than five hours.

Today, things are different.

In April 2020, a trip to the liquor store to pick up some milk or Snickers bar feels like a getaway. It makes the good ol' days when we could come and go as we please seem like some type of illusion.

Lithuanian traveler, writer, and journalist Liudas Dapkus, invited people to relive their adventures abroad by recreating their favorite travel photos in their homes.

In many of the photos people are wearing the same clothes and standing in the same positions, but the background isn't quite as picturesque.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum recently announced that it was designing a Dr. Anthony Fauci bobblehead. The NBHFM pledged to donate $5 of each sale of the $25 item to support the 100 Million Mask Challenge—an initiative of the Protect the Heroes Campaign that is trying to increase the supply of surgical masks for medical workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

Less than a week later, they've already had enough pre-sale orders to raise over $100,000 for the cause.

Keep Reading Show less
popular