Most Shared

17 stunning photos inspired by one woman's infinite love for her pup.

Pets are so much more than furry little creatures running around the house. They're family.

Anne Geier rescued her first dog, Cindy, on Dec. 11, 2007.

Anne had just gotten divorced, and she had a big goal: capture moments and create images of Cindy that would last a lifetime.

Anne wanted to improve her photography, too, so that meant enlisting more "dog models" like Cindy. Lucky for us, other pet owners were happy to oblige — and now we have some amazing images of adorable puppies loving this fall weather!


Sadly, Cindy died in August 2016. She was 14 years old. But the devastating loss fueled Anne's desire to dive even further into pet photography to help others commemorate their pet's lives.

Image by Anne Geier/Facebook, featured with permission.

"Cindy was the perfect model — she was eager, patient, and always graceful," Geier says. "Cindy meant to me everything and can´t tell you how happy I am that this magnificent dog was part of my life for the last eight years."

Here are 17 of Anne's most adorable dog portraits, in honor of Cindy:

1. Mesmerizing, isn't it?

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

2. The colors, the background — so much beautiful going on here!

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

3. This is so majestic, it almost looks like a classical painting.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

4. The most adorable peek-a-boo ever.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

5. There's no hiding that precious face in this beautiful photo.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

6. Is that pooch hugging a tree? I believe so. Melting...

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

7. It doesn't get much more beautiful than this.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

8. This is what you call a "happy accident."

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

9. No words. Just look at those faces!

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

10. Bubbles, bubbles — so many bubbles. Simply perfect.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

11. Wow! Another photo that looks just like a painting

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

12. Extra points for posing with a flower crown. Good girl!

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

13. Another happy accident. You can't plan a butterfly landing on a cute little schnoz.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

14. Two words: simply stunning.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

15. A black dog looking off into the distance never looked so serene.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

16. Yes. This is an actual photograph. My mind is blown, too.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

17. Saving the best for last with these two adorable pooches nuzzling. You're welcome.

Image by Anne Geier, featured with permission.

Anne found her passion in life, and she says she has her beloved dog to thank.

"I just owe her so much. She was the reason why my whole life changed. Just to name a few things, since Cindy was in my life I spent much more time in nature, I became a very balanced person, I discovered my passion [for] photography. ... In short, she completed my life," she says.

Pet photography requires a very special set of skills: a good eye, creativity, and a whole lot of patience. And Anne (who's based in Austria) appears to have all three qualities. The proof is in her amazing photos of dogs enjoying all the wonders nature has to offer. She even offers tips to anyone interested in trying pet photography.

Plus, these photos are simply a beautiful celebration of how much our dogs love us and how much they love the fall.

Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

Keep Reading Show less

I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

Keep Reading Show less

Most women, at one point or another, have felt some wariness or fear over a strange man in public. Sometimes it's overt, sometimes it's subtle, but when your instincts tell you something isn't right and you're potentially in danger, you listen.

It's an unfortunate reality, but reality nonetheless.

A Twitter thread starting with some advice on helping women out is highlighting how real this is for many of us. User @mxrixm_nk wrote: "If a girl suddenly acts as if she knows you in public and acts like you're friends, go along w[ith] it. She could be in danger."

Other women chimed in with their own personal stories of either being the girl approaching a stranger or being the stranger approached by a girl to fend off a situation with a creepy dude.

Keep Reading Show less