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Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Did someone order some mood-boosting serotonin?

dog, dad and daughter

Upworthy's weekly roundup of joy

Spring has sprung, y'all! Officially on paper, at least. It's still flippin' cold and brown where I live, but we can see the daffodils stretching their way out of the ground and it won't be long before everything bursts into bloom.

Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "Earth laughs in flowers." That feels true, doesn't it? These early days of spring are a bit like preparing to watch your favorite comedy, snuggled up on the couch with your people (or your cat), nummy snacks and comfy pants, smiling in anticipation because you know you're about to have some big laughs.

Hopefully, that's also how you feel jumping into these weekly roundups of joy, knowing you're about to get hit with some mood-boosting serotonin and cant-help-but-smile goodness. (That's how I feel each week pulling these lists together–it's like a little weekly smile therapy.)


Thankfully, you don't have to wait to enjoy these bursting blossoms of joy! Off we go…

1. There can't possibly be anything sweeter than this kid singing 'Three Little Birds'

I just want to put him in my pocket and bring him out any time I need a little lift. Gracious, that sweet voice and face are simply angelic.

2. Dad gives his baby girl a relaxing 'spa day' while Mom and big sis are out at the salon

So soothing just to watch her temples being massaged! What a lovely core memory he's creating for her. Read the full story here.

3. Speaking of relaxation, has a baby alligator ever been this happy?

Amazing what a little hydration can do. I've never seen an alligator display this much personality. It's actually, dare I say, cute?

5. Security guard named 'Pocket' might be the biggest Taylor Swift fan at the concert

That's right, Pocket. Embrace your Swiftie status and dance like nobody's watching. We love to see it.

5. Bruce Willis being showered with love on his 68th birthday is what it's all about

His diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia is incredibly tough, but seeing him smiling and surrounded by the support of his family, is beautiful to witness. Read the full story here.

6. 100-year-old Grace Linn is an inspiration with her speech about banning books

@jodipicoultbooks

I am so inspired by everyone who spoke up against book bánning at the Martin County School Board meeting today, including Grace Linn. Grace is, in her words, “100 years young.” She spoke about witnessing the rise of fascism during WWII, about losing her husband to the war when he was 26, and about protecting our freedom to read. Thank you, Grace, for reminding us that this is a part of history we must not repeat.

She's seen things in her life and she knows why this is important. How great to see her using her voice—and sewing skills—to defend the freedom to read.

7. Dad who never wants his picture taken makes an exception for the perfect dad joke

Dad's gonna dad joke. It's like, the law or something. Gotta love it.

8. Good doggo does the 'pick a card' date challenge and it's the cutest thing ever

@opiethepitbully

Do we want to see a part 2? 👀 PJs & robe by @toothandhoney code WILDLY10 to save #pitbulls #bullybreedsoftictok #pitbulls_official #pitbullsaresweet #cutedogs

The teddy bear robe is everything. I'm not even a dog person and this has me all "Awwwww."

9. Irish dance meets Megan Thee Stallion and it's an unexpectedly awesome combo

@morgvn.elizabeth

#irishdance #fyp #keepingactive #spacethings #foryou

Irish dance is savage, so it's a natural mashup when you think about it. Read more about the amazing Morgan here.

10. Kids from Dream Catchers Academy in Nigeria recreated Rihanna's halftime dance and DANG

That's the kind of energy we all need to carry us through the weekend!

Hope you enjoyed this week's roundup. If you'd like these posts sent to your inbox each week, sign up for our free newsletter, The Upworthiest, here.

Keep smiling, everyone!

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A photo of Jordan Anderson.

In 1825, at the approximate age of 8, Jordan Anderson (sometimes spelled "Jordon") was sold into slavery and would live as a servant of the Anderson family for 39 years. In 1864, the Union Army camped out on the Anderson plantation and he and his wife, Amanda, were liberated. The couple eventually made it safely to Dayton, Ohio, where, in July 1865, Jordan received a letter from his former owner, Colonel P.H. Anderson. The letter kindly asked Jordan to return to work on the plantation because it had fallen into disarray during the war.

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Dayton, Ohio,
August 7, 1865
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