World traveler challenges people to recreate their vacation photos ... in their own homes

The goalposts have really been moved on what one would call a vacation these days. To call something a vacation it used to require a trip on an airplane or at least a car ride of more than five hours.

Today, things are different.

In April 2020, a trip to the liquor store to pick up some milk or Snickers bar feels like a getaway. It makes the good ol' days when we could come and go as we please seem like some type of illusion.

Lithuanian traveler, writer, and journalist Liudas Dapkus, invited people to relive their adventures abroad by recreating their favorite travel photos in their homes.

In many of the photos people are wearing the same clothes and standing in the same positions, but the background isn't quite as picturesque.


People have been posting their photos under #quarantinetravelerchallenge.

Liudas kicked off the challenge with a photo of himself holding his Maine Coon, Česlovas. In the original 2018 photo taken in Queensland, Australia, Liudas is holding a koala.

via Liudas Dapkus / Facebook


Liudas' post inspired some great attempts to relive some great travel moments, but they all fell short of the original glory.


aisteborjas/ Instagram


The toilet photo was just slightly less dangerous of an undertaking.


via Travel Planet Keliones


That lake looks a little tough to water ski on.


jurgakas / Instagram


The second photo is slightly less of a religious experience.


via Audra KondroteReport


No danger of being bitten by a monkey in photo one.


svagarm / Instagram


Photo number two kinda sucks.


Egle Geniene


Wrong species, ma'am.


via Gabrielė Štaraitė /FAcebook


Nope.


Travel Planet kelionės


She didn't even have the enthusiasm to jump.


Rasa Tilvikiene


We know Hollywood Blvd. when we see it.


A Komanda


Well, we hope she at least has the memories.


Travel Planet kelionės


This dude's towel origami needs some work.


via Travel Planet kelionės


it's hard to surf when you're 35 feet above sea level.


via TravelPlanetKeliones


The smile is the same, but the background is not.


TravelPlanetKeliones


The water pressure is slightly different in photo number two.


via Vitalij NaumenkoReport

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.