World traveler challenges people to recreate their vacation photos ... in their own homes

The goalposts have really been moved on what one would call a vacation these days. To call something a vacation it used to require a trip on an airplane or at least a car ride of more than five hours.

Today, things are different.

In April 2020, a trip to the liquor store to pick up some milk or Snickers bar feels like a getaway. It makes the good ol' days when we could come and go as we please seem like some type of illusion.

Lithuanian traveler, writer, and journalist Liudas Dapkus, invited people to relive their adventures abroad by recreating their favorite travel photos in their homes.

In many of the photos people are wearing the same clothes and standing in the same positions, but the background isn't quite as picturesque.


People have been posting their photos under #quarantinetravelerchallenge.

Liudas kicked off the challenge with a photo of himself holding his Maine Coon, Česlovas. In the original 2018 photo taken in Queensland, Australia, Liudas is holding a koala.

via Liudas Dapkus / Facebook


Liudas' post inspired some great attempts to relive some great travel moments, but they all fell short of the original glory.


aisteborjas/ Instagram


The toilet photo was just slightly less dangerous of an undertaking.


via Travel Planet Keliones


That lake looks a little tough to water ski on.


jurgakas / Instagram


The second photo is slightly less of a religious experience.


via Audra KondroteReport


No danger of being bitten by a monkey in photo one.


svagarm / Instagram


Photo number two kinda sucks.


Egle Geniene


Wrong species, ma'am.


via Gabrielė Štaraitė /FAcebook


Nope.


Travel Planet kelionės


She didn't even have the enthusiasm to jump.


Rasa Tilvikiene


We know Hollywood Blvd. when we see it.


A Komanda


Well, we hope she at least has the memories.


Travel Planet kelionės


This dude's towel origami needs some work.


via Travel Planet kelionės


it's hard to surf when you're 35 feet above sea level.


via TravelPlanetKeliones


The smile is the same, but the background is not.


TravelPlanetKeliones


The water pressure is slightly different in photo number two.


via Vitalij NaumenkoReport

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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