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World traveler challenges people to recreate their vacation photos ... in their own homes

The goalposts have really been moved on what one would call a vacation these days. To call something a vacation it used to require a trip on an airplane or at least a car ride of more than five hours.

Today, things are different.

In April 2020, a trip to the liquor store to pick up some milk or Snickers bar feels like a getaway. It makes the good ol' days when we could come and go as we please seem like some type of illusion.

Lithuanian traveler, writer, and journalist Liudas Dapkus, invited people to relive their adventures abroad by recreating their favorite travel photos in their homes.

In many of the photos people are wearing the same clothes and standing in the same positions, but the background isn't quite as picturesque.


People have been posting their photos under #quarantinetravelerchallenge.

Liudas kicked off the challenge with a photo of himself holding his Maine Coon, Česlovas. In the original 2018 photo taken in Queensland, Australia, Liudas is holding a koala.

via Liudas Dapkus / Facebook


Liudas' post inspired some great attempts to relive some great travel moments, but they all fell short of the original glory.


aisteborjas/ Instagram


The toilet photo was just slightly less dangerous of an undertaking.


via Travel Planet Keliones


That lake looks a little tough to water ski on.


jurgakas / Instagram


The second photo is slightly less of a religious experience.


via Audra KondroteReport


No danger of being bitten by a monkey in photo one.


svagarm / Instagram


Photo number two kinda sucks.


Egle Geniene


Wrong species, ma'am.


via Gabrielė Štaraitė /FAcebook


Nope.


Travel Planet kelionės


She didn't even have the enthusiasm to jump.


Rasa Tilvikiene


We know Hollywood Blvd. when we see it.


A Komanda


Well, we hope she at least has the memories.


Travel Planet kelionės


This dude's towel origami needs some work.


via Travel Planet kelionės


it's hard to surf when you're 35 feet above sea level.


via TravelPlanetKeliones


The smile is the same, but the background is not.


TravelPlanetKeliones


The water pressure is slightly different in photo number two.


via Vitalij NaumenkoReport

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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