When Kayla Denney took over the animal shelter in Taft, Texas five months ago, it was—in her words—a "hot mess." The rudimentary building had no electricity, a lone hose for cleaning out kennels, and very limited supplies for taking care of the animals. What they did have was "blue juice"—the chemical injection used to euthanize animals. Every Wednesday was "kill day"—the sad solution to the problem of animals with nowhere to go and no one to care for them properly.

"The animals looked sad. The building looked sad," city manager, Denise Hitt said in a video. "So I decided we were going to make a change." She and Taft police chief John Cornish met with Kayla Denney, and came up with a plan to transform the facility into a no-kill shelter.


RELATED: Pets are becoming social media managers to inspire pet lovers to adopt.

Denney, who has dedicated her life to saving animals, initiated a miraculous turnaround for the dogs and cats of Taft, a town of about 3,000 people. She immediately connected with anyone she knew who fostered or rescued animals. She organized donation drives to get supplies and started a Facebook page to spread the word about animals needing homes. Now, she organizes a team of volunteers, and even makes house calls to check in on folks who have taken in dogs or cats to see if they need anything.

Her hard work has paid off quickly. Since she came on five months ago, no animals at the shelter have been euthanized.

"As of November 1st, we have saved 565 dogs and cats out of Taft," Denney told KZTV News.

Unbeknownst to her, someone nominated Denney for a Petco Foundation Unsung Heroes Award. She was one of five finalists out of thousands of nominees who were awarded $10,000 each in February. And on November 14, she will be awarded the top prize, which comes with additional $25,000, at the Petco Foundation Lifesaving Impact Awards.

Denney says the money will help improve conditions at the shelter for the animals she serves.

"It's an older shelter and its run down," Denney told KZTV. "We got lights thanks to a donor who put in electricity for us, but I want indoor outdoor kennels with a guillotine in between so when it's raining we can put them inside. We want an area where they can have meet and greet out in the field and somewhere they can have grass time rather than just cement time."

RELATED: Football player locked himself in a hot car to show what it's like for dogs

"Every dog deserves a chance, whether it's in my shelter or not," she says.

Watch the inspiring story of how Denney turned Taft's animals shelter around here:

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It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

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Sounds simple, right?

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Yesterday, photos from the first day of school in two different Georgia school districts revealed the startling reality that "safe" school reopenings aren't happening in some areas. Now it's come to light that one of those same school districts had a positive case in an elementary school classroom on the first day of school, proving that opening schools in an uncontrolled pandemic is simply not going to work.

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