Why we really shouldn't laugh at those naked Donald Trump statues.

There are a lot — and I mean A LOT — of valid reasons to criticize Donald Trump.

There's the fact that he mocked a disabled reporter. There's when he said that women who have abortions should be "punished." There's his belief that the concept of climate change was "created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive."

There's his insistence that President Obama wasn't born in the U.S. and might be a secret Muslim. There's his long history of misogyny. There's his praise of Saddam Hussein. There's the fact that he has a history of borrowing memes from white supremacists. There's his plan to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants and put a (temporary) ban on Muslims from entering the country.


And, well, you get the idea.

Slate lists 183 things (and counting) Donald Trump has said or done that they believe make him "unfit to be president." In any case, maybe you support him or maybe you don't. The point is that there are some really valid concerns people have about putting the man in the White House.

Huuuuuuge reasons to criticize him. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

On the morning of Aug. 18, 2016, statues of this potential president-to-be popped up around the country. Naked statues.

In New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Cleveland, and Seattle, the statues mysteriously appeared overnight in public areas.

Attributed to anarchist art collective, Indecline, the series is titled "The Emperor Has No Balls," a play on Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes." As the title suggests, each statue is missing a certain part of its anatomy (and also represents a nearby body part as being on the small side of things).

Bystanders photograph and pose with a statue meant to resemble a naked Donald Trump in Union Square Park in New York. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Even in removing the statue, the New York Parks Department had a bit of fun at Trump's expense. "NYC Parks stands firmly against any unpermitted erection in city parks, no matter how small," said parks spokesman Sam Biederman in a statement.

At first glance, it's pretty funny, right? It takes one of Trump's deepest insecurities and puts it on full display to the world.

This is the man, remember, who used his platform during one of the Republican primary debates to defend the size of his hands.

"Look at those hands, are they small hands?" said Trump in response to a comment by rival Sen. Marco Rubio days earlier. "And, he referred to my hands — 'if they're small, something else must be small.' I guarantee you there's no problem. I guarantee."

"Look at those hands, are they small hands?" Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

While the commotion over the size of Trump's hands began as a joke written in a 1988 issue of the now-defunct Spy magazine (they called him a "short-fingered vulgarian"), it's haunted him ever since. In 2011, seemingly unprompted, he brought the insult up in an interview with the New York Post, saying, "My fingers are long and beautiful, as, it has been well documented, are various other parts of my body."

So clearly this is something that gets to him. As he's someone who has a tendency to attack others for their appearance (he once went on a two-minute rant against Rosie O'Donnell in which he called her "disgusting," "a loser," and repeatedly mocked her weight), it seems like he should be fair game for his own appearance-based criticism, right? Well...

In times like this, It's important to remember the message Michelle Obama delivered during her powerful speech at the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

During a section devoted to how she and her husband set out to raise their daughters, Sasha and Malia, the first lady touched on an important life lesson: how to deal with a bully.

GIF from CNN/YouTube.

Mocking someone for their appearance? Yeah, that's something a bully would do.

On Facebook, writer Ijeoma Oluo called out the folks who are reveling in Trump's appearance-based public humiliation, echoing that same sentiment. "I hate how often I have to say this, but if we are truly committed to fighting toxic masculinity, cis-hegemony and body-shaming we cannot tie Trump's sexist, racist, ableist, Islamophobic, classist bullshit to his dick size," she writes.

I hate how often I have to say this, but if we are truly committed to fighting toxic masculinity, cis-hegemony and...

Posted by Ijeoma Oluo on Thursday, August 18, 2016

Is Donald Trump a bully? Yes, yes he is.

But do we have to stoop to his level in order to criticize him? No, we don't.

"When they go low, we go high." Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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