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When this blonde famous woman reaches for her hair, I'm *really glad* it's all a joke.

Satire does a good job of showing just how weird it gets for people of color talking about their art. Caitlin FitzGerald (star of Showtime's "Masters of Sex") and Nana Mensah (star of "An African City" webseries) have made this satire to show just that. Laugh and cringe and maybe catch that contagious feeling of ... what is it? Ahhhh, empathy.

When this blonde famous woman reaches for her hair, I'm *really glad* it's all a joke.

Are you ready to go from zero to Jay-Z in under a minute?

So, it gets weird out there for people of color talking about their art.

"QUIT WHINING! ALL ART IS HARD TO DO!" — a voice inside of you


Wait.

Why is this something to care about? Because stereotypes. They mess with all of us. And movies help fight them, but they also help support them. What to do!?

A good place to start is to make fun of them. Mock them! Take them DOWN.

And that's what filmmaker, Nana Mensah ...

... and her friend Caitlin FitzGerald ...

... set out to do in this satirical short.

Stereotypes that Deserve to Be Mocked

1. Getting called "articulate," like, WAY too much.

2. Who are "your people" exactly? You'd better know!

3. Be prepared to speak for everyone who looks like you.

4. And get ready for random pats on the head.

5. Also, be ready to talk about your interests like they're something really deep because you're DEFYING stereotypes NOW because now that's an important thing because you've been so intensely pigeonholed, you try to talk your way out of it using random interests!!!!!

Why is it so easy to make a silly video about these things happening? Because they do happen.

A lot.

And you wanna know a big reason why?

Lack of diversity in film.

I SEE WHITE PEOPLE.

Of the top 500 grossing films 2007-2012, ONLY *12.4%* of speaking characters were played by black actors.

(By comparison, 75.8% white characters had speaking roles)

So how do we change that?

Support something different.

It's the stereotypes that cause the reactions they're satirizing in the vid. Stereotypes are the enemy here.

Sure, ridding the world of stereotypes is not as easy as a jazzy Paul Rudd karate chop, but it *is* as easy as paying attention and getting to know each other.

Then before we know it ... we think differently.

And frankly, the more you see of other types of people (like IN MOVIES!), the more likely you are to be chill and accepting of other people. That means the same for your kids! For you!

Pretty soon, we look at people who don't LOOK like us and instead of seeing the stereotype, we see ourselves.

And it looks pretty cool.

Like, Jay-Z level cool.

How to begin? Laugh those stereotypes right off of our screens (and out of our lives):

Your move, Hollywood.

We'll just be over here, being chill and accepting.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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"I now pronounce you, in debt. You may kiss the bride."

In 1964, Paul McCartney of the Beatles famously sang, “I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love.” While Mr. McCartney’s sentiments were definitely a major foreshadowing of the hippie, free-love movement that was to come in the ‘60s, it appears as though he was also onto a big truth that wouldn’t be proven for another 50 years.

Seven years ago, researchers Hugo M. Mialon and Andrew Francis-Tan from Emory University embarked on the first study to determine whether spending a lot on a wedding or engagement ring meant a marriage would succeed or fail.

The pair wanted to see if the wedding industry was being honest when it came to claims that the more money a couple spends, the more likely they are to stay together.

“The wedding industry has consistently sought to link wedding spending with long-lasting marriages. This paper is the first to examine this relationship statistically,” the researchers wrote.

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Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande duked it out on Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show.'

There are pop stars, and then there are singers. While recording studio technology can make people sound like amazing singers, the proof is in their live performances.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande took it a whole step further on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," delivering not only a jaw-dropping live performance but doing so in the form of revolving pop diva hits in an "impossible karaoke" showdown. In less than five minutes, they showed off their combined ability to nail pretty much anything, from imitating iconic singers' styles to belting out well-known songs with their own vocal stylings.

Watch this and try not to be impressed:

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