'What makes someone boring?' These are the best answers from a great discussion on Reddit.
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The great Oscar Wilde had a perfect way of determining whether he liked someone or not. "It is absurd to divide people into good and bad," Wilde said. "People are either charming or tedious."


Everyone we know falls somewhere on the charming to tedious spectrum. They're either fun or boring.

So what makes a person fun?

Glenn Geher Ph.D. from Psychology Today breaks it down into seven qualities. They are extroverted, emotionally stable, open-minded, conscientious, and agreeable. They also have a great sense of humor — they make good jokes and laugh at yours — and are creative.

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But what about the other end of the spectrum, those who are boring? Obviously, they have a lot of the traits that are the opposite of a fun person. They are introverted, closed-minded, argumentative, and can't take a joke.

Reddit user u/miss wanted to get down to the bottom of why people are boring so they asked the online forum "What makes someone boring?" and received some fantastic responses. The most common response is someone who isn't curious or passionate.

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People don't want to be around those who are disengaged or don't care much about the world around them. They are also bored by people who only have one interest whether it's their job, relationship or hobby.

People want to be around those who are well-rounded.

Here is a run down of the most popular and thoughtful responses to the question: "What makes someone boring?

The number one answer: Boring people have no curiosity or passion.


Some people just can't tell a story.


Super serious people are super boring.



Being pedantic is really boring.



They make everything about themselves.





All they talk about is getting f'd up.




They are stuck in their ways.




People who make everything political.



While the conversation on Reddit was a great way for people to vent about the people and personality types that bore them to tears it's also an invitation for all of us to reflect on our own personalities.

As we grow older, we can get stuck in our ways. We may become hyper-focused on just our jobs or families. Chances are that if we're boring other people then we probably aren't enjoying our own lives to the fullest.


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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.