Trump’s Supreme Court nominee just shockingly turned his back on a Parkland parent.
Photo by Saul Loeb/Getty Images.

It wasn’t a good opening day for Brett Kavanaugh

Tuesday was the most important day of Kavanaugh’s professional life. As Donald Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee, the eyes of the political world were squarely on his appearance before the U.S. Senate.

But it was a decidedly human moment that could end up making the biggest impression.


During a break in the hearing, Fred Guttenberg attempted to shake Kavanaugh’s hand. Guttenberg is the father of Jamie Guttenberg, who was murdered during the Parkland mass shooting earlier this year.

In a shocking moment, Kavanaugh paused to look at Guttenberg before turning his back and walking away before a security guard quickly stepped in between the two men.

Photo by Saul Loeb/Getty Images.

Photo by Brandan Smilowski/Getty Images.

The moment was as strange as it was shocking.

Twitter quickly erupted in understandable outrage.

In a follow-up tweet, Guttenberg made it clear this wasn’t an attempted political stunt, even if that’s what it has rapidly evolved into.

No matter what Brett Kavanaugh thinks about gun laws, or how nervous he might have been in the moment, there’s no excuse for turning his back on someone who literally just offered his hand in greeting.

Sometimes the smallest of human interactions reveal the largest truths about a person’s character. And in this case, it could be fairly damning evidence for Brett Kavanaugh, someone whose questionable nomination to America’s highest court already hangs perilously in the balance.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.