This moving video calling for LGBT equality was made 5 years ago. Here's what's changed since then.
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The Atlantic Philanthropies

This stirring video from All Out calling for full LGBT equality in every country around the world was made five years ago.

Let's see how we've done since then.

The United States has actually done pretty well!


Image by All Out.

In 2010, same-sex marriage was only legal in six states and the District of Columbia. As of May 12, 2015, it was legal in 37 states plus D.C. Woo hoo!

On the other hand, it's still largely OK to fire people based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. According to the ACLU, only 17 states and D.C. prohibit both forms of employment discrimination. The Employee Non-Discrimination Act — which was designed to make it illegal to hire or fire someone because they're L, G, B, or T — is still held up in Congress because ... Congress. Boo.

Not perfect but not bad. All in all, I'd give us a solid B.

Some countries are really killing it on equality.

Image by Yaddah/Wikimedia Commons.

The U.K. took the top slot in Rainbow Europe's annual survey of LGBTI rights, scoring 86% in 2015, owing largely to the introduction of marriage equality all throughout Great Britain and new programs designed to combat homophobia in schools. And Scotland scored even better at 92%.

But even Scotland isn't perfect. Like most places, it still has a spotty record on trans and intersex rights.

An A-, I think, for them.

So much work remains to be done worldwide.

Image by All Out.

According to the video, homosexuality was a crime in 76 countries in 2010.

That's ... still true. In fact, it may be even higher. As of 2014, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association counted 78 countries where homosexual acts are considered illegal. Even more shockingly, in five of those countries, the prescribed penalty for committing homosexual acts is death. An additional four have language on the books that could be read to call for death.

We've made some great progress in the last five years. But there's still a long, long way to go.

LGBT folks need to be able to live freely and openly without having to fear for their lives, their jobs, or their safety. And the folks who made that video five years ago? They're still at it trying to make it happen (check 'em out when you get a chance).

Let's make sure that the next five years are even more productive than the last.

Images by All Out.

Or maybe we can get it all done by next week. Who's with me?!

via Abigail Mack / Instagram and Abigail Mack / TikTok

Abigail Mack, an 18-year-old high school senior from Massachusetts, is over the moon after being admitted to Harvard during the most competitive admission season of all time.

Applications to the university skyrocketed during the pandemic and it was only able to accept 1,968 out of 57,435 first-year applicants, less than 4%.

However, Abigail didn't just overcome long odds during the application process, she was accepted because she was able to thrive as a high school student after losing her mother to cancer. Her experience losing a parent was the topic of her inspiring admissions essay which has touched countless lives.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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