This art teacher helped stressed out students 'chill' with a Bob Ross flash mob.

This art teacher knows that the best way to battle stress is to turn on a Bob Ross painting tutorial.

Thanks to Netflix airing "Chill with Bob Ross," a whole new generation is enjoying the smooth vocal stylings and relentlessly positive vibe of everyone's favorite paint-by-television icon. I grew up watching episodes of "The Joy of Painting" after school. I can't count how many times I've watched Ross mix a little Phthalo Blue with a little Titanium White and tap out happy little cloud after happy little cloud.

My husband and I recently introduced the show to our kids, and we all came to an agreement: There is nothing more oddly therapeutic than chilling with Bob Ross.


Brady Sloane, who teaches art at Madison Middle School in Abilene, Texas, agrees. She noticed that many of her nearly 50 advanced art students were under a lot of stress because of their workload, and she wanted to find a way to reward them for their hard work.

That's when she decided they could use a little Bob Ross therapy.  

Sloane provided Bob Ross costumes to make it extra fun for students.

Ross's bushy perm, buttoned-down button up shirts, and 80's jeans have become a classic Halloween costume. So Sloane took advantage of the look and created a painting "flash mob" in her classroom, making her nearly 50 pre-AP art students into mini-Bob Rosses, complete with curly wigs.

The students seemed to enjoy the goofy costumes. "We were laughing so much when we put our wigs on," one student told KRBC news.

"I was really wanting to reward my students in a meaningful way and provide an enriching art-related experience," Sloane told the news station, "But also honor the hard work that they've been doing."

It wasn't all silly fun and games—the students actually learned some valuable art skills during the class period.

Sloane said her students got a lot out of the Joy of Painting episode they painted from, in which Ross painted a landscape scene in grayscale.

"They're actually learning sponge brush techniques, landscape painting, alla prima painting, working at an easel. But they're really getting to paint like so many artists do in real life."

They're also undoubtedly learning to internalize Ross's favorite phrase of encouragement he offered his students: "We don't make mistakes—we only have happy little accidents."

What a fun lesson for these eighth graders. Watch more about the students' Bob Ross day here:

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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