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In the 1930s, none of this seemed possible. But here we are.

Ingeborg Rapoport escaped two oppressive government regimes (one was McCarthy-era USA ... oops), got a ton of education, reduced the infant mortality rate in a huge western country (Germany), became Europe's first neonatal professor, and raised a Harvard professor (and three other kids!).

But she wasn't done.


It was time to stick it to the Nazis.

BOOM goes the doctorate. Image via The National Archives UK/Flickr and German Federal Archives/Wikimedia Commons (altered).

How?

By finishing the degree from the University of Hamburg that the Nazi regime denied her when she was 25.

At the age of 102.

And not an honorary one. NO! It's the actual doctorate she was denied in 1937 because her mom was of Jewish descent.

She'd done everything she needed to do to get a medical doctorate. She just had to defend her thesis on diphtheria (a leading cause of infant death in Germany in 1937, when she was originally set to graduate).

But according to the Nuremberg Laws passed in 1935, she wasn't allowed to do her oral exam.

That's messed up.

Fast forward 77 butt-kicking years later, and Ingeborg was going to defend her doctoral thesis.

We're talking a thesis on diphtheria. And not 1937 diphtheria ... modern diphtheria. Yes. She would have to be completely adept and she would be graded on the normal University of Hamburg scale for defending a doctoral thesis in 2015. Very serious. And very hard.

ONE EXTRA PROBLEM:

Ingeborg can't see very well anymore.

She can no longer read normal text, and she cannot use a computer.

NO.

No no no.

But she didn't worry.

Because she had friends. She had been living in Berlin after leaving McCarthy-era America in the '50s. She'd had an amazing medical career. But it was time to form a study group! Her study group studied up for her (they researched, read, and studied modern diphtheria) and called her up to recite all their new diphtheria knowledge!

Her study group of friends gave her all the details she needed. After all, she did have a head start (big-time) as one of the top neonatal doctors in Germany. But at 102 when you have a doctoral thesis to defend, ya gotta have friends.

AND?

She passed.

She told the BBC:

"It was about the principle ... I didn't want to defend my thesis for my own sake. After all, at the age of 102 all of this wasn't exactly easy for me. I did it for the victims [of the Nazis]."

BOOM.


Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Teacher of the year explains why he's leaving district in unforgettable 3-minute speech

"I'm leaving in hopes that I can regain the ability to do the job that I love."

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For all of our disagreements in modern American life, there are at least a few things most of us can agree on. One of those is the need for reform in public education. We don't all agree on the solutions but many of the challenges are undeniable: retaining great teachers, reducing classroom size and updating the focus of student curriculums to reflect the ever-changing needs of a globalized workforce.

And while parents, politicians and activists debate those remedies, one voice is all-too-often ignored: that of teachers themselves.

This is why a short video testimony from a teacher in the Atlanta suburb of Gwinnett County went viral recently. After all, it's hard to deny the points made by someone who was just named teacher of the year and used the occasion to announce why he will be leaving the very school district that just honored him with that distinction.

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