These kids aren't all right. 7 photos show you a world of change.
True
Gates Foundation

Children are already living it.

Photographers from around the world share photos of kids to help us see what climate change really looks like.

1. Fire.

This young man from Shuswap, British Columbia, is hanging out in his family pickup, watching the world around him go up in flames.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @nina_berman @noorimages


The tiny pine bark beetle, thriving in hot, dry summers and mild winters, is causing millions of acres of trees to die all over the western U.S. and British Columbia. And what do hot, dry summers plus acres of standing dead timber mean?You guessed it: big, hot wildfires. They've gotten so severe that it's become a pastime to go out at night and watch the "fireworks."

2. Sea level rise.

Body surfing is fun, but these kids on Kiribati have too much of a good thing. Rising seas beat against the seawall that provides the only protection for their families' homes.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @ashleycrowtherorg

Kiribati, an island nation in the central Pacific, is anticipated to be the first country to lose all its land to rising seas caused by climate change. Can you imagine growing up in a place that you knew was disappearing under the waves forever?

3. Shrinking Arctic ice.

Heading back to the family hunting camp, a young boy near Kivalina, Alaska, helps his dad carry a precious catch. Thin, mushy ice is making finding food much harder.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @timmatsui

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. Less coastal ice in the winter means less time and space to hunt, as well as less wildlife. And villages along the coast are much less protected during powerful winter storms.

(Polar bears, walruses, and other animals rely on the winter ice for hunting too. )

4. Strange weather.

Two very serious tour guides from Xikrin greet a photographer visiting their Kayapó community in the Brazilian Amazon.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @carobennett

Their ancestors have passed down stories about their environment for generations. Will their knowledge be able to guide these children in the future?

5. Super storms.

Kids can make a game of anything. Three girls play in a fog of mosquito repellent near bunkhouses that remain home for thousands of refugees from Typhoon Haiyan. When will the next storm hit?

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @coleenjose

The "super typhoon" left almost 4 million people homeless, 6,300 dead, and 1,061 missing. The Philippines is #1 on the list of countries expected to be most affected by intensifying storms, floods, and heat waves.

6. War.

What to make of her new home? A Syrian girl looks pensive in the Al Za'atri refugee camp in Jordan. Conflicts over water remain the root of Syria's civil war.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @edkashi/@viiphoto

Climate change and one of the worst droughts in modern history have been directly connected to the war in Syria, which has displaced millions and devastated an entire nation.

7. Drought.

Friends hang on the parched streets of Stratford, California, where the economy is drying up along with the land.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @mrobinsonchavez

Drought is a slow, quiet killer of wildlife, livestock, crops, and ways of life. For a fourth straight year, lack of snow in the Sierra Nevada has meant low meltwater to feed many rivers and irrigated fields in California. 430,000 acres of choice Central Valley agricultural land will lie fallow during the growing season of 2015 due to lack of rain and snow.

A lot of us can relate to what at least one of these kids is facing.

We can change direction. We have the technology to shift away from climate-changing fossil fuels.

Let's make sure the kids are all right.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande duked it out on Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show.'

There are pop stars, and then there are singers. While recording studio technology can make people sound like amazing singers, the proof is in their live performances.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande took it a whole step further on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," delivering not only a jaw-dropping live performance but doing so in the form of revolving pop diva hits in an "impossible karaoke" showdown. In less than five minutes, they showed off their combined ability to nail pretty much anything, from imitating iconic singers' styles to belting out well-known songs with their own vocal stylings.

Watch this and try not to be impressed:

Keep Reading Show less
True

When Deidra Mayberry was a child, she struggled with reading. Feeling embarrassed and ashamed, she did her best to hide it. And she was pretty good at hiding it. As her family moved around a lot, due to her parents' military career, she adapted and kept hiding it — making it all the way through school without anyone really noticing.

After graduating from high school, she started looking for support to improve her reading skills.

"I was turned away because I was over the age of 17, and other private options like one-on-one tutoring were financially out of reach for me."

Deidra promised that one day she'd do something to fix it. After struggling for years, and eventually finding support, she started a nonprofit to help other adults facing their own challenges with literacy. Now she's striving to help the almost 43,000,000 adults who still are struggling. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES), 21 percent of adults in the United States (about 43 million) fall into the illiterate/functionally illiterate category.

For Deidra, college was the first time she experienced and understood what functional illiteracy was. Someone who is illiterate is unable to read or write at all, but someone who is functionally illiterate has some reading skills — they're just not strong enough to manage daily living and employment tasks.

She was able to graduate by taking extra summer semesters, spending long nights studying, changing her major when it got too hard, and getting help from her dad.

"I was so proud that I actually made it through college and graduated," Deidra says. "But once I started to apply for jobs, reality kicked in fast. I never truly fixed my literacy problems. Instead, I found ways to work around them in order to spare myself the embarrassment and shame that I already felt daily."

"I relied heavily on movies to teach me and give me exposure to things in life that would help me relate to others," she says. "This caused me to live a life of fear, limitations, and hopelessness."

"I felt unworthy because I knew I had this big secret — and thought if people knew, they would see that I had no value."

Deidra continued to live like this for years until she had a lightbulb moment.

"I was working so hard to hide my literacy struggle in order to make it work, but I asked myself, 'What if I worked just as hard to fix it?'"

She found the courage to tell a friend, who began tutoring her. "The hope, courage, and confidence she helped me find was the beautiful moment of empowerment that reminded me to create and provide a resource for people just like me."

That's exactly what she did. On March 12, 2020, she and another friend decided to start a nonprofit to help other adults that were functionally illiterate. And even though COVID-19 shut down businesses and sent people into lockdown the very next day, she didn't let it stop her.

"I just believed God was with me and the time was still now because people have been waiting for this," she says.

She launched Reading to New Heights, an organization that teaches adults the fundamentals of reading with one-on-one, confidential and virtual tutoring sessions with certified educators.

"The curriculum that our educators teach from allows our adult learners to revisit the fundamentals of reading and comprehension as if they are learning them for the first time," Deidra says. "Basic reading foundations such as phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, spelling, vocabulary and comprehension are exactly what adults struggling with illiteracy need in order to build competent literacy skills and fill the gaps that illiteracy causes in education."

And most importantly, these services are provided at no cost, so that anyone who needs them has access.

"Though illiteracy and functional illiteracy can affect anyone, people in low-income and underserved communities of color are more likely to be limited in education, income, and workplace advancement opportunities because of it."

"Illiteracy and functional illiteracy can be directly linked to higher prison populations, lower household incomes, and inaccessibility to quality healthcare," Deidra explains. "By committing to developing the fundamentals of reading, our adult learners overcome both the psychological and environmental limitations of illiteracy."

Since they launched, the nonprofit has been featured on Fox 4 News, which gave them the exposure they needed to grow from three adult program participants to 20 — and they hope to continue growing. They have also been accepted into an Incubator Program with the United Way, which is designed to support them while they build their business.

Deidra is one of Tory Burch's Empowered Women this year. The donation she receives as a nominee is being awarded to her new and growing nonprofit.

"It's kind of ironic, the very thing I was ashamed of and thought I had to hide for years was the one thing that, once I shared it, not only freed me but gave me hope and provided a way to help others," Deidra says. "I love that my story has been about helping others find the courage to share and take the first step to start their literacy journey."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen. Do you know an inspiring woman like Deidra? Nominate her today!

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

Keep Reading Show less