These kids aren't all right. 7 photos show you a world of change.
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Gates Foundation

Children are already living it.

Photographers from around the world share photos of kids to help us see what climate change really looks like.

1. Fire.

This young man from Shuswap, British Columbia, is hanging out in his family pickup, watching the world around him go up in flames.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @nina_berman @noorimages


The tiny pine bark beetle, thriving in hot, dry summers and mild winters, is causing millions of acres of trees to die all over the western U.S. and British Columbia. And what do hot, dry summers plus acres of standing dead timber mean?You guessed it: big, hot wildfires. They've gotten so severe that it's become a pastime to go out at night and watch the "fireworks."

2. Sea level rise.

Body surfing is fun, but these kids on Kiribati have too much of a good thing. Rising seas beat against the seawall that provides the only protection for their families' homes.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @ashleycrowtherorg

Kiribati, an island nation in the central Pacific, is anticipated to be the first country to lose all its land to rising seas caused by climate change. Can you imagine growing up in a place that you knew was disappearing under the waves forever?

3. Shrinking Arctic ice.

Heading back to the family hunting camp, a young boy near Kivalina, Alaska, helps his dad carry a precious catch. Thin, mushy ice is making finding food much harder.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @timmatsui

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. Less coastal ice in the winter means less time and space to hunt, as well as less wildlife. And villages along the coast are much less protected during powerful winter storms.

(Polar bears, walruses, and other animals rely on the winter ice for hunting too. )

4. Strange weather.

Two very serious tour guides from Xikrin greet a photographer visiting their Kayapó community in the Brazilian Amazon.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @carobennett

Their ancestors have passed down stories about their environment for generations. Will their knowledge be able to guide these children in the future?

5. Super storms.

Kids can make a game of anything. Three girls play in a fog of mosquito repellent near bunkhouses that remain home for thousands of refugees from Typhoon Haiyan. When will the next storm hit?

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @coleenjose

The "super typhoon" left almost 4 million people homeless, 6,300 dead, and 1,061 missing. The Philippines is #1 on the list of countries expected to be most affected by intensifying storms, floods, and heat waves.

6. War.

What to make of her new home? A Syrian girl looks pensive in the Al Za'atri refugee camp in Jordan. Conflicts over water remain the root of Syria's civil war.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @edkashi/@viiphoto

Climate change and one of the worst droughts in modern history have been directly connected to the war in Syria, which has displaced millions and devastated an entire nation.

7. Drought.

Friends hang on the parched streets of Stratford, California, where the economy is drying up along with the land.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Photo by @mrobinsonchavez

Drought is a slow, quiet killer of wildlife, livestock, crops, and ways of life. For a fourth straight year, lack of snow in the Sierra Nevada has meant low meltwater to feed many rivers and irrigated fields in California. 430,000 acres of choice Central Valley agricultural land will lie fallow during the growing season of 2015 due to lack of rain and snow.

A lot of us can relate to what at least one of these kids is facing.

We can change direction. We have the technology to shift away from climate-changing fossil fuels.

Let's make sure the kids are all right.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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