Trump's new favorite coronavirus 'frontline doctor' says demon dream sex causes infertility

A handful of doctors stood on the steps of the Supreme Court of the United States yesterday and repeatedly spewed misinformation about COVID-19, including the already debunked claim that hydroxychloroquine is a "cure" and the erroneous and dangerous idea that people shouldn't wear masks to limit the spread of the coronavirus. Breitbart, a right-wing media company that routinely fails fact checks and doesn't even try to hide its bias, shared live video of it. And before the video was removed from social media sites for pushing misinformation—which sites are doing to attempt to get people to stop believing YouTube quackery over renowned, respected professionals—tens of millions of people ate it up and shared it, including the president of the United States.

Put another way, 0.001% of the million or so doctors in the U.S.—none of whom are epidemiologists, virologists, or infectious disease experts—reached millions of gullible Americans with a false message, calling actual scientific research "disinformation" and claiming that they know better than the people who have spent their entire careers studying viruses and researching infectious disease because they are "America's Frontline Doctors."

No, they are not "America's Frontline Doctors." They are teeny tiny thimble-full of doctors, and none of them are experts on viral disease.


In fact, among the approximately dozen doctors in the group, two are opthamologists. That's an eye doctor. When you want to know the best and safest way to build a bridge, do you look to structural engineers or electrical engineers? No brainer, right? Medical specialties exist for a reason. If you're dealing with a novel virus, you look to the people who study novel viruses as their career.

Also among those doctors is a pediatrician and Christian minister, whose medical practice sits in the same Texas strip mall as her "Firepower Ministries" church. She says she's treated hundreds of patients with hydroxychloroquine and that people don't need to wear masks because we already have the "cure" for COVID-19. She has also said that gynecological issues like cysts, endometriosis, and infertility are caused by people having spirit sex with demons and witches in their dreams.

From her website, which appears to be down but can be viewed archived—and phew, it's a doozy:

"Many women suffer from astral sex regularly. Astral sex is the ability to project one's spirit man into the victim's body and have intercourse with it. This practice is very common amongst Satanists. They leave their physical bodies in a dormant state while they project their spirits into the body of whoever they want to have sex with."

Oh, and here's her sermon on the topic so you don't even have to leave the page:

Deliverance From Spirit Husbands and Spirit Wives (Incubus and Succubus) Part one www.youtube.com

So let's see, who should we be listening to?

Should we listen to the vast majority of actual frontline physicians, among the 600,000+ strong who wrote a joint letter to the Trump administration just 11 days ago? The ones who are asking for public health expertise to lead the way and for the Center for Disease Control—whose entire purpose is to control disease—to keep its rightful role in managing the data necessary for battling the pandemic? The ones who aren't pushing a political stance or agenda, but simply asking that the world's leading public health professionals and epidemiologists who have served under multiple presidents of different parties be allowed to do their jobs?

Or a dozen random doctors led by a pro-Trump physician, backed by the Tea Party Coalition, and pushed by a questionable far-right outlet? A group that includes no experts in infectious disease among them, but does boast a licensed physician who makes completely unscientific claims about spirit sex causing medical conditions? A group who poo-poos the majority opinion of scientists and researchers who, after multiple studies, have determined that hydroxychloroquine, not matter what it's combined with, is not a cure and is in fact potentially harmful for COVID patients?

The choice is not hard, folks. As ER doctor Anand Swaminathan wrote on Twitter, "Hydroxychloroquine propaganda from America's Frontline Doctors is complete nonsense. This is the message of hucksters, not doctors."

The scariest thing about this is that people believe this stuff. They see a handful of doctors in white coats standing on the Supreme Court steps (um, why?), and because they say things that run counter to "mainstream" science and align with their conspiratorial views, they believe it.

Perhaps it has to be repeated a thousand times. When a tiny group of voices loudly go against the majority of scientists and medical professionals, that's when you need to be extra skeptical and exercise those critical thinking muscles to their fullest.

Why would the famously apolitical Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the world's leading infectious disease experts and most well-respected professionals in his field, toss away all of his life's work under six different presidents in the final years of his career to be part of some kind of bizarro conspiracy to mislead the masses? Why would the vast majority of doctors do that (and rest assured, it would have to be the vast majority of doctors in on it if things really were not what mainstream science claims)? It doesn't even makes sense on its face.

On the other hand, Donald Trump desperately wants to be reelected, and this pandemic and the mitigation measure that have to be taken to control it are seriously hurting his chances. And there are some people who are desperate enough to do or say anything to help keep him and/or the Republican party in power, including some doctors who will claim that everyone else is pushing "disinformation" and claim they're the only ones brave enough to tell the truth. They're a teeny tiny minority, but they're loud. It's an old trick. Don't fall for it. Doctors can be quacks. Just because they're wearing a white coat, that doesn't make them credible.

The good news is that despite the amount of virtual oxygen videos like this take up, public opinion still backs up actual science. The vast majority of Americans are wearing masks in public, at least sometimes. And according to a poll by The Hill, most Americans support some kind of mask mandate.

I'm still maintaining hope that most people won't fall for stuff like this video or the astral sex argument. I mean, wow. I knew 2020 was handing it to us by the shovelful, but the president pushing a doctor who pushes demon dream sex as medical issue was definitely not one I saw coming.


Photo courtesy of Yoplait
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When Benny Mendez asked his middle school P.E. students why they wanted to participate in STOKED—his new after school program where kids can learn to skateboard, snowboard, and surf—their answers surprised him.

I want to be able to finally see the beach, students wrote. I want to finally be able to see the snow.

Never having seen snow is understandable for Mendez's students, most who live in Inglewood, CA, just outside of Los Angeles. But never having been to the beach is surprising, since most of them only live 15-20 minutes from the ocean. Mendez discovered many of them don't even know how to swim.

"A lot of the kids shared that they just want to go on adventures," says Mendez. "They love nature, but...they just see it in pictures. They want to be out there."

Mendez is in his third year of teaching physical education at View Park K-8 school, one of seven Inner City Foundation Education schools in the Los Angeles area. While many of his students are athletically gifted, Mendez says, they often face challenges outside of school that limit their opportunities. Some of them live in neighborhoods where it's unsafe to leave their houses at certain times of day due to gang activity, and many students come to his P.E. class with no understanding of why learning about physical health is important.

"There's a lot going on at home [with my students]," says Mendez. "They're coming from either a single parent home, or foster care. There's a lot of trauma behind what's going on at home...that is out of our control."

Photo courtesy of Yoplait

What Mendez can control is what he gives his students when they're in his care, which is understanding, some structure, and the chance to try new things. Mendez wakes up at 4:00 a.m. most days and often doesn't get home until 9:00 p.m. as he works tirelessly to help kids thrive. Not only does he run after school programs, but he coaches youth soccer on the weekends as well. He also works closely with other teachers and guidance counselors at the school to build strong relationships with students, and even serves as a mentor to his former students who are now in high school.

Now Mendez is earning accolades far and wide for his efforts both in and out of the classroom, including a surprise award from Yoplait and Box Tops for Education.

Yoplait and Box Tops are partnering this school year to help students reach their fullest potential, which includes celebrating teachers and programs that support that mission. Yoplait is committed to providing experiences for kids and families to connect through play, so teaming up with Box Tops provided an opportunity to support programs like STOKED.

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Dr. David McPhee offers advice for talking to someone living in a different time in their head.

Few things are more difficult than watching a loved one's grip on reality slipping away. Dementia can be brutal for families and caregivers, and knowing how to handle the various stages can be tricky to figure out.

The Alzheimer's Association offers tips for communicating in the early, middle and late stages of the disease, as dementia manifests differently as the disease progresses. The Family Caregiver Alliance also offers advice for talking to someone with various forms and phases of dementia. Some communication tips deal with confusion, agitation and other challenging behaviors that can come along with losing one's memory, and those tips are incredibly important. But what about when the person is seemingly living in a different time, immersed in their memories of the past, unaware of what has happened since then?

Psychologist David McPhee shared some advice with a person on Quora who asked, "How do I answer my dad with dementia when he talks about his mom and dad being alive? Do I go along with it or tell him they have passed away?"

McPhee wrote:

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When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!