There are so many icebergs, we thought we’d see who's who from this year's class.

Icebergs! They're gorgeous, chilly, and might remind you of some of the people you went to high school with.

Or at least they might by the end of this article.

And because sea ice is breaking off more frequently, we're seeing more and more of these gorgeous chunks of icecap float away into the sea. With so many icebergs hitting the news lately, we thought we'd take a look at this recent class to see what their future holds.


Most likely to end up in a cocktail glass: Franklin.

Franklin may be small, but he enjoys the finer things in life. Image from Liam Quinn/Flickr.

Most likely to star in a "Titanic" remake: Aisha.

She's been the star of the school play since "Dr. Seuss Meets the Easter Bunny" back in kindergarten. Image from Kim Hansen/Wikimedia Commons.

Most likely to become an ice sculpture ... goes to Malcolm.


He's taken every single arts and crafts class. Even woodworking! Image from Drew Avery/Flickr.

Most likely to be on the cover of National Geographic: Emilia.

Looking stunning, as always. Image from Drew Avery/Flickr.

Most likely to be confused for the island of Jamaica: Bobbi.

Bobbi, also known as B-15, was nearly 200 miles long and broke off Antarctica in the year 2000. Image from NSF/Josh Landis/Wikimedia Commons.

Weirdest fashion sense: Nathan.

You're supposed to be 90% underwater, Nathan! Image from robynm/Pixabay.

Best bromance goes to Jesse and Sam.

They're inseparable! At least they were, but I hear they might break up soon. Image from Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons.

Most likely to have a meltdown: Anders.

High-stress situations make him sweat! Image from Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons.

Best party host goes to Kim.

Everyone always comes over to her place on Saturday. Image from Jason Auch/Wikimedia Commons.

...and finally, last but not least, class president: Stephanie.

She ran on calving reform and fewer leopard seals. Image from Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

This a big class! And that's the problem.

It's great to see all these icebergs, but what's not so good is their rate of graduation.

It's hard to count exactly how many icebergs exist at any one time, but experts say we have more today than we did even when the Titanic sailed. And that's because they're graduating from their ice shelves (and glaciers) much too quickly.

So while they're stunning, we're seeing these beauties way more often than we should be. Seriously, it seems like every year, there's some new mega-berg, like this one in 2014 or this one in 2010. In fact, Antarctica is losing over 300 square kilometers of sea ice every year.

We'd rather see these icebergs stay together! (BFFs! Never lose touch! Class of '16 forever!)

I mean, check out these pictures from NASA. Those are the before-and-after shots of a 20-mile-long iceberg about to crack its way off the Nansen Ice Shelf.

Images from Jesse Allen/NASA Earth Observatory.

The breakup happened over the last two years. The crack itself runs nearly the entire length of the ice sheet and is as wide as a football field.


Don't leave us! Stay together! Image from Jesse Allen/NASA Earth Observatory.

That whole section is about to detach from the ice shelf.

And though sea ice doesn't contribute to sea level rise (as opposed to land-based ice), too much melt can cause other problems, like slowing down ocean currents and increasing the amount of sunlight being absorbed by the ocean. Plus, big ice shelves help act like a cork, keeping land-based ice from slipping into the sea, where it does contribute to sea level rise.

Climate change is one of the biggest problems we are going to have to tackle in the near future and, unfortunately, there are still people — people who want to be world leaders — who refuse to take it seriously.

There's still plenty we can do — like letting go of fossil fuels — so don't despair. But now is the time to act and keep next year's "Iceberg Yearbook" as small as possible.

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As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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