The new ‘Impossible Burger’ is so realistic the human body might not be able to tell the difference.
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Have you heard of the Impossible Burger? It’s widely considered to be the best vegetarian burger for folks who want a veggie burger that most closely resembles one made from meat.

It’s become a massive hit in America, showing up in restaurants across the country and often selling out in popular dining spots.

The founders recently unveiled the “Impossible 2.0” during the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. In fact, it’s the first ever food product to be displayed by the legendary trade show and reportedly “left the crowd stunned with its smell, texture, flavor and color -- almost like a real hamburger.”


And the 2.0 is such a masterful approximation of the “real thing” that it made one vegetarian food critic physically ill as his primal mind told his body he was eating meat, even though his conscious mind knew he was eating a plant-based food.

“I have a pretty strong stomach. Roller coasters are my jam. Virtual reality never makes me queasy,” Joan Solsman writes on CNET, noting she’s been a vegetarian for more than 10 years.

Solsman was tasting out some of the 2.0 in the form of a pseudo steak tartare, noting that even the local Vegas chef said he couldn’t tell the difference between animal-based steak other than tasting less iron. So far so good. Then Solsman swallowed her first bit of the Impossible creation.

My stomach started objecting to what was going on in my mouth. "I haven't had beef in more than a decade," I said through my mouthful, hoping the disclaimer might mask my growing revulsion. "It's kind of grossing me out."

Solsman said she had a much better experience eating the traditional preparation of the Impossible -- in burger form:

The very best was the actual burger -- with the soft bun, tangy sauce, zesty crunch of barely-there raw onion and refreshing crisp of lettuce and tomato. Combined with the juicy, chewy patty, it tasted amazing because it tasted like a real burger.

However, she also notes that she’s not necessarily opposed to meat -- after all, she only became a vegetarian because of her husband.

And even the real steak tartare isn’t necessarily a big hit with traditional carnivores. Still, it’s hard to deny the allure of one vegetarian’s body literally rejecting what on some level it is convinced is actual meat.

Like the emerging industry of lab-grown meat, the Impossible line of products is offering an increasingly viable alternative that has much, much more to offer than simply a tasty option for those already on the vegetarian or vegan side of the aisle.

After all, reducing our consumption of meat -- and eventually phasing out livestock farms entirely -- is great for the environment, good for reducing the spread of viruses, and, of course, great for the animals we’re not killing.

If we can do all that while enjoying a burger so good it makes some people sick, all the better.

And if you think that’s something special, just wait. Impossible founder Pat Brown said the company’s next unveiling is going to be a vegan steak.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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