Heroes

Teen clockmaker Ahmed Mohamed dropped by the White House Astronomy Night.

Ahmed was there, but he left his 'cool' clock at home.

Remember last month when a kid named Ahmed brought a clock to school, and it became this whole big thing?

He built a clock and decided to bring it to school. His teachers thought it was a bomb (or a fake bomb), called the police, and had him suspended. It was this whole ordeal, and if you're just getting caught up, you can read about it all right here.

And then President Obama was all like, "Hey, come hang out."



Fast forward to last night, when the president hosted the seventh annual White House Astronomy Night.

This year's White House Astronomy Night was geared toward encouraging students to look into education and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — commonly referred to as STEM fields.

A post on the White House's website reads, "We are bringing today's students — and tomorrow's engineers, scientists, and innovators — to the South Lawn of the White House to gaze at the moon and the stars, to learn through hands-on STEM activities, and to hear from astronauts and other scientists about their exciting experiences."

Here's President Obama addressing the crowd on the White House South Lawn. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

In attendance at this year's gathering was — you guessed it — our guy, Ahmed Mohamed.

He met briefly with the president, but this clock-building superstar was in high demand.

"We talked about Mars and 2030, and I talked to him about the generator that I'm making and how it could help people on Mars," Ahmed told CBS News of his meeting with President Obama.

But he forgot his clock at home, though! Ahmed! You had one job! Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Between snapping selfies with former astronaut and NASA associate administrator for the science mission directorate John Grunsfeld, taking in the stars, and enjoying the atmosphere, it seems like Ahmed had quite a night.

Ahmed Mohamed takes a selfie with NASA's John Grunsfeld. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Also in attendance were Bill Nye, Jamie and Adam from Mythbusters, and students from around the country.

Here they are, along with NASA deputy administrator Dava Newman.


It was a chance to celebrate some recent achievements like NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto.

On Jan. 19, 2006, the New Horizons probe was launched. This July, it completed the first-ever successful flyby of Pluto — our favorite not-quite-a-planet planet.


And the president gave a quick call to the International Space Station. No biggie or anything.


Oh, and there was also a big telescope, which is pretty cool.

Here's the president with Brooklyn, New York, student Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, checking out the stars through a telescope on the White House lawn. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Image.

Ahmed may have been the special guest, but there's something universal about the wonders of space we can all enjoy.

Keep dreaming. Keep building. Keep doing your thing, Ahmed.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

You can check out President Obama's full astronomy night remarks below.

He tells a really cool little story about Carl Sagan. This is totally worth the watch.