Heroes

Teen clockmaker Ahmed Mohamed dropped by the White House Astronomy Night.

Ahmed was there, but he left his 'cool' clock at home.

Teen clockmaker Ahmed Mohamed dropped by the White House Astronomy Night.

Remember last month when a kid named Ahmed brought a clock to school, and it became this whole big thing?

He built a clock and decided to bring it to school. His teachers thought it was a bomb (or a fake bomb), called the police, and had him suspended. It was this whole ordeal, and if you're just getting caught up, you can read about it all right here.

And then President Obama was all like, "Hey, come hang out."



Fast forward to last night, when the president hosted the seventh annual White House Astronomy Night.

This year's White House Astronomy Night was geared toward encouraging students to look into education and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — commonly referred to as STEM fields.

A post on the White House's website reads, "We are bringing today's students — and tomorrow's engineers, scientists, and innovators — to the South Lawn of the White House to gaze at the moon and the stars, to learn through hands-on STEM activities, and to hear from astronauts and other scientists about their exciting experiences."

Here's President Obama addressing the crowd on the White House South Lawn. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

In attendance at this year's gathering was — you guessed it — our guy, Ahmed Mohamed.

He met briefly with the president, but this clock-building superstar was in high demand.

"We talked about Mars and 2030, and I talked to him about the generator that I'm making and how it could help people on Mars," Ahmed told CBS News of his meeting with President Obama.

But he forgot his clock at home, though! Ahmed! You had one job! Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Between snapping selfies with former astronaut and NASA associate administrator for the science mission directorate John Grunsfeld, taking in the stars, and enjoying the atmosphere, it seems like Ahmed had quite a night.

Ahmed Mohamed takes a selfie with NASA's John Grunsfeld. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Also in attendance were Bill Nye, Jamie and Adam from Mythbusters, and students from around the country.

Here they are, along with NASA deputy administrator Dava Newman.


It was a chance to celebrate some recent achievements like NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto.

On Jan. 19, 2006, the New Horizons probe was launched. This July, it completed the first-ever successful flyby of Pluto — our favorite not-quite-a-planet planet.


And the president gave a quick call to the International Space Station. No biggie or anything.


Oh, and there was also a big telescope, which is pretty cool.

Here's the president with Brooklyn, New York, student Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, checking out the stars through a telescope on the White House lawn. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Image.

Ahmed may have been the special guest, but there's something universal about the wonders of space we can all enjoy.

Keep dreaming. Keep building. Keep doing your thing, Ahmed.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

You can check out President Obama's full astronomy night remarks below.

He tells a really cool little story about Carl Sagan. This is totally worth the watch.

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Often, parents of children with special needs struggle to find Halloween costumes that will accommodate medical equipment or provide a proper fit. And figuring out how to make one? Yikes.

There's good news; shopDisney has added new ensembles to their already impressive line of adaptive play costumes. And from 8/30 - 9/26, there's a 20% off sale for all costume and costume accessory orders of $75+ with code Spooky.

When looking for the right costume, kids with unique needs have a lot of extra factors to consider: wheelchair wheels get tangled up in too-long material, feeding tubes could get twisted the wrong way, and children with sensory processing disorders struggle with the wrong kind of fabric, seams, or tags. There are a lot of different obstacles that can come between a kid and the ability to wear the costume of their choice, which is why it's so awesome that more and more companies are recognizing the need for inclusive creations that make it easy for everyone to enjoy the magic of make-believe.

Created with inclusivity in mind, the adaptive line is designed to discreetly accommodate tubes or wires from the front or the back, with lots of stretch, extra length and roomier cut, and self-stick fabric closures to make getting dressed hassle-free. The online shop provides details on sizing and breaks down the magical elements of each outfit and accessory, taking the guesswork out of selecting the perfect costume for the whole family.

Your child will be able to defeat Emperor Zurg in comfort with the Buzz Lightyear costume featuring a discreet flap opening at the front for easy tube access, with self-stick fabric closure. There is also an opening at the rear for wheelchair-friendly wear, and longer-length inseams to accommodate seated guests. To infinity and beyond!

An added bonus: many of the costumes offer a coordinating wheelchair cover set to add a major boost of fun. Kids can give their ride a total makeover—all covers are made to fit standard size chairs with 24" wheels—to transform it into anything from The Mandalorian's Razor Crest ship to Cinderella's Coach. Some options even come equipped with sounds and lights!

From babies to adults and adaptive to the group, shopDisney's expansive variety of Halloween costumes and accessories are inclusive of all.

Don't forget about your furry companions! Everyone loves to see a costumed pet trotting around, regardless of the occasion. You can literally dress your four-legged friend to look like Sven from Frozen, which might not sound like something you need in your life but...you totally do. CUTENESS OVERLOAD.

This year has been tough for everyone, so when a child gets that look of unfettered joy that comes from finally getting to wear the costume of their dreams, it's extra rewarding. Don't wait until the last minute to start looking for the right ensemble!


*Upworthy may earn a portion of sales revenue from purchases made through affiliate links on our site.

Those of us raising teenagers now didn't grow up with social media. Heck, the vast majority of us didn't even grow up with the internet. But we know how ubiquitous social media, with all of its psychological pitfalls, has become in our own lives, so it's not a big stretch to imagine the incredible impact it can have on our kids during their most self-conscious phase.

Sharing our lives on social media often means sharing the highlights. That's not bad in and of itself, but when all people are seeing is everyone else's highlight reels, it's easy to fall into unhealthy comparisons. As parents, we need to remind our teens not to do that—but we also need to remind them that other people will do that, which is why kindness, empathy, and inclusiveness are so important.

Writer and mother of three teen daughters, Whitney Fleming, shared a beautiful post on Facebook explaining what we need to teach our teenagers about empathy in the age of social media, and how we ourselves can serve as an example.

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