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rescue

A rescue helicopter flying high above the wilderness.

A woman was riding Colorado’s Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Train on Monday, October 10, when she noticed a distressed person near a riverbed waving frantically to the train.

The Durango Herald noted that it was incredible the woman was spotted because she “could only be seen from a very limited and particular angle.”

The Office of Emergency Management, San Juan County Colorado said in a Facebook post that after the passenger noticed the woman she notified train staff who initiated an emergency response. The staff notified Delton Henry who was following behind the train in the inspection motor car.

Henry pulled up to where the woman was last seen, called to her across the riverbed and learned she had a broken leg and couldn’t move. A superintendent for the train called 911 to get help from the San Juan County Search and Rescue.

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Photo by Erik Mclean on Unsplash

Ambulance

Jet packs and jet suits have been part of science fiction and fantasy fiction for a long time but who would’ve thought we could really be living like "The Jetsons" sooner rather than later? Paramedics in the UK have been trying out a jet suit to reach stranded explorers who have been injured in remote areas. The Great North Air Ambulance Service (GNAAS) is testing out the flying jet suits invented by Richard Browning from Gravity Industries. Andy Mawson, the director of operations from GNAAS, hopes to have the technology fully up and running by the summer of 2022.

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A pilot who survived a plane crash was pulled from the aircraft seconds before a train smashed into it.

It's like watching a scene from an action film, only it's real.

A pilot flying a Cessna 172 aircraft lost power and crashed shortly after takeoff from Whiteman Airport in California's San Fernando Valley on Sunday, according to the Associated Press. The FAA clocked the crash as occurring at approximately 2:10 p.m., with the plane coming to a stop at a railroad crossing just blocks from the Los Angeles Police Department's Foothills Division station, about 20 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

Officers arrived at the scene, and at 2:15 p.m.—just five minutes after the plane crash-landed—a train barreled into the airplane, smashing it to pieces. Thankfully, four officers on the scene were able to extricate the pilot from the aircraft, literally seconds before the Metrolink train slammed into it. Video of the rescue was captured on bodycam and by a bystander from distance, and it's just about the most harrowing real-life footage imaginable.

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A viral post about changing your voicemail greeting when stranded is debunked by rescuers.

Multiple news stories of people being stranded in the wilderness have circulated recently, from the tragic story of a family that died of heat exhaustion and dehydration in the California mountains to the odd story of a lost hiker who refused to answer phone calls from rescuers for 24 hours because they didn't recognize the phone number. And along with those stories has come a wave of viral posts sharing some wise-sounding advice for if you're ever stuck somewhere without cell service and a low battery.

The problem is, the advice isn't wise after all.

The viral post suggests changing your outgoing voicemail message to include your location. One version reads:

"If ever lost while hiking, stranded with a broken-down vehicle or other emergency situation, if your cell phone battery is low here is a tip that can very well save your life. Change your outgoing voicemail on your phone to a message that gives your approximate location, the time, the date, your situation; lost, out of gas, car broken down, injured, etc... plus any special instructions such as; 'You are staying with the car', 'You are walking towards a town' If your cell phone dies, stops working or loses signal your voicemail will still be working. Anyone calling your phone will hear your emergency instructions. They will know you need help and know where to find you or where to send help."

Sounds smart, but a Colorado rescue team has explained why it's not:

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