Sometimes you hear a story that's so absurd that your first response is, "No freaking way." Then you read more details, realize that the absurd thing actually did happen, and alternate between outright outrage and a resigned "Well, of course."

I've lost count of how many times that scenario has played out in recent years. It's pretty much daily at this point. I feel like every media outlet should have a WTF section. Good times, fellow humans.

So, in today's WTF news, a middle school teacher at J.W. Dodd Middle School in Freeport, NY allegedly handed out historical slavery-era photographs and asked her eighth grade students to caption them. She then implored students to make the captions "funny" because she didn't want to be bored.

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If a blood donation organization asks for more donations from black people, does that make them racist?

GIF from "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air."

No, no it does not. But it's an argument the folks at NHS' Give Blood in the U.K. have heard one too many times.

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In case you missed it, there are legitimate talks of a straight pride parade in Boston, potentially slated for the end of August. While there are sadly supporters of this concept, there have been far more people trolling the idea of Straight Pride, including Captain America aka Chris Evans.


Many of the straight people who don't support the false equivalence of a "straight pride parade" have been feeling secondhand embarrassment by the whole ordeal.

To this very point, the Twitter user Deon expressed his secondhand embarrassment at the concept of a straight pride parade, and asked white people if they feel similarly about race.


The question of whether white people feel secondhand embarrassment obviously hit a nerve, because the answers quickly came flooding in like a river. Given centuries of history, and the current political climate, and well, a lot of white culture in general - many of us have found ourselves cringing by association at one point or another.

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This article originally appeared on SomeeCards. You can read it here.

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For most of her life, Balanda Atis has had trouble finding a foundation that matches her skin tone. And she's far from the only woman of color to have this problem.

Growing up in a Haitian community in East Orange, New Jersey, she often heard women in her community voice their frustrations over it. There simply weren't enough specific foundation colors out there for non-white women, so they'd end up using shades that didn't really suit their skin tone.

Even after Atis started working in makeup development at L'Oréal over 18 years ago, this skin tone issue remained prevalent. It actually wasn't until 2011 that their foundation line got the diversity makeover it needed. And that's largely thanks to her.

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