Jameela Jamil is a gift to the world. The Good Place actor is a tireless champion for the body positive movement and has no problem calling out other celebrities for hawking dangerous diet products. She has come for the Kardashians, Iggy Azaelia, and even Cardi B (brave), and she WILL come for you if you use your massive platform to promote products that dangerously encourage young girls to lose weight. So consider yourself warned.

At the center of these controversies is a company called Flat Tummy Co., which markets diet and detox (read: diarrhea) teas, mainly to young women and girls. According to their website, these products have "not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration." And apparently the company wasn't satisfied with their teen consumer base and decided to expand....by marketing to pregnant women.

Reality star Amber Rose, who is currently pregnant, shared an ad yesterday for a Flat Tummy Tea product that is specifically geared towards helping pregnant women stay thin and "not bloated." Hell, while we're at it, let's put the baby on a diet, too, shall we!!!??? This might seem like an episode of Black Mirror, but I assure you, it's not. Here's the ad:

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