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football


When the Philadelphia Eagles' season came to an unceremonious end last weekend, many fans were, understandably, more than a little pissed.

Take the rest of the night off to sleep in your shame, boys. Photo by Elsa/Getty Images.

After the final game, one fan allegedly commented on Facebook that the team had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!"

Photo by David R. Tribble/Wikimedia Commons.

...according to the Pennsylvania Ballet, which reported encountering the post on the social media site.

The Pennsylvania Ballet, whose company members regularly wear tutus, had a few choice words for anyone who thinks their light, frequently pink costumes mean they're not "tough."

Commence epic reply...



(full text transcribed under the post).

A Facebook user recently commented that the Eagles had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!"

Our response:

"With all due respect to the Eagles, let's take a minute to look at what our tutu wearing women have done this month:

By tomorrow afternoon, the ballerinas that wear tutus at Pennsylvania Ballet will have performed The Nutcracker 27 times in 21 days. Some of those women have performed the Snow scene and the Waltz of the Flowers without an understudy or second cast. No 'second string' to come in and spell them when they needed a break. When they have been sick they have come to the theater, put on make up and costume, smiled and performed. When they have felt an injury in the middle of a show there have been no injury timeouts. They have kept smiling, finished their job, bowed, left the stage, and then dealt with what hurts. Some of these tutu wearers have been tossed into a new position with only a moments notice. That's like a cornerback being told at halftime that they're going to play wide receiver for the second half, but they need to make sure that no one can tell they've never played wide receiver before. They have done all of this with such artistry and grace that audience after audience has clapped and cheered (no Boo Birds at the Academy) and the Philadelphia Inquirer has said this production looks "better than ever".

So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs."

Happy New Year!

In case it wasn't obvious, toughness has nothing to do with your gender.

Gendered and homophobic insults in sports have been around basically forever — how many boys are called a "pansy" on the football field or told they "throw like a girl" in Little League?

"They played like they were wearing tutus" is the same deal. It's shorthand for "You're kinda ladylike, which means you're not tough enough."

Pure intimidation.

Photo by Ralph Daily/Flickr.

Toughness, however, has a funny way of not being pinned to one particular gender. It's not just ballerinas, either. NFL cheerleaders? They get paid next to nothing to dance in bikini tops and short-shorts in all kinds of weather — and wear only ever-so-slightly heavier outfits when the thermometer drops below freezing. And don't even get me started on how mind-bogglingly badass the Rockettes are.

Toughness also has nothing to do with what kind of clothes you wear.

As my colleague Parker Molloy astutely points out, the kinds of clothes assigned to people of different genders are, and have always been, basically completely arbitrary. Pink has been both a "boys color" and a "girls color" at different points throughout history. President Franklin D. Roosevelt — longtime survivor of polio, Depression vanquisher, wartime leader, and no one's idea of a wimp — was photographed in his childhood sporting a long blonde hairstyle and wearing a dress.

Many of us are conditioned to see a frilly pink dance costume and think "delicate," and to look at a football helmet and pads and think "big and strong." But scratch the surface a little bit, and you'll meet tutu-wearing ballerinas who that are among toughest people on the planet and cleat-and-helmet-wearing football players who are ... well. The 2015 Eagles.

You just can't tell from their outerwear.

Ballerinas wear tutus for the same reason football players wear uniforms and pads:

Photo by zaimoku_woodpile/Flickr.


To get the job done.


This article originally appeared on 01.05.16

Deion Sanders during an interview in 2022.

Deion Sanders changed our perceptions of an an athlete when he was one of the handful of people to ever play in the National Football League (1989 to 2005) and Major League Baseball simultaneously (1989 to 1997 and 2001).

Now, he’s changing perceptions on the sidelines as a head college football coach by being passionate, provocative and unapologetically “old school.”

Last season, the Colorado Buffaloes only won one game. This year, after hiring Sanders as a coach, the team is 3-0. One of the big reasons for the overnight change is that Sanders had no problem firing the entire coaching staff and replacing most of the team’s players.


Before the season began, Sanders told the team he was going to be hard on them and bring in a bunch of new guys from the transfer portal. If the players weren’t with how he was running things, he asked them to transfer out of the program.

“Now, if you went for that, if you were able to let words run you off, you ain’t for us because we’re a old-school staff,” he told “60 Minutes.” “We coach hard. We coach tough. We’re disciplinarians. So, if you’re allowing verbiage to run you off because you don’t feel secure with your ability, you ain’t for us,” he said.

"I’m sure that your straight talk was appreciated by some. But, is this scorched-earth policy good for college football or for the kids?” interviewer Jon Wertheim asked.

“I think truth is good for kids. We’re so busy lyin’, we don’t even recognize the truth no more in society,” Sanders replied. “We want everybody to feel good. That’s not the way life is. Now, it is my job to make sure I have what we need to win. That makes a lot of people feel good. Winning does,” he said.

Sanders’ honesty is probably refreshing to a lot of people who think kids are too coddled these days. What’s interesting is that his ultimate goal is exactly the same as a parent or coach who sugarcoats things. Sanders believes that by pushing young people hard they can achieve great things and through that success comes happiness.

Little boy and his mom get surprised with tickets to Eagles game.

In today's world, it's easy to get caught up in all the negative news we're exposed to, but in reality, most good deeds are done away from a camera—just one person helping another without desire for fanfare. And for mom Bryanne McBride and her young son, Mason, that's exactly what they were doing when they got the surprise of a lifetime.

Bryanne was approached by a man in a parking lot asking for a dollar to catch the bus. The entire time, the mom scrounged around in her purse looking for spare change and revealed she felt bad because she thought she had some. Bryanne's desire to help was a simple act of kindness to another human in need without the expectation of something in return.

During the time it took for the unsuspecting mother to dig for loose change, the "stranded" stranger, Zach, introduced himself and asked if the duo were from Philly. Once they said they were from the area, he then inquired if they were Eagles fans...the football team, not the birds. "You ever been to an Eagles game?" Zach asked.


The two quickly said no but the mom was focused on retrieving some quarters for this stranger. Zach continued to question them about the Eagles game, asking, "Would you want to go one day?" The answer was an enthusiastic yes, though Bryanne never broke her gaze from the purse as she looked for change. When she finally relented that she had no money in her purse and would need to check her car, she came back to a surprise.

Zach asked why Bryanne was so willing to help him and her response was just more evidence that she's simply a kind person. "I hate telling people no, especially when I can help," she said. After she handed him the money, he gave it to Mason and said he didn't actually need it before handing the generous mom $500 in cash. But Zach wasn't done—he had tickets to the Eagles game that night and gave the mother and son the tickets.

Watch their sweet exchange:

Joy

NFL fans say the trainer who gave Damar Hamlin life-saving CPR should be in the Hall of Fame

Who’s more deserving of the NFL’s highest honor than Denny Kellington?

Washington Football Team at. Buffalo Bills from Highmark Stadium, Buffalo, NY September 26th, 2021

The most touching moment during Week 18 of the NFL season was after veteran Buffalo Bills wide receiver John Brown made a thrilling 42-yard diving catch for a touchdown. When he returned to the sidelines, he quietly gave the game ball to Bills assistant trainer Denny Kellington.

It was a gesture of thanks for Kellington’s quick thinking during the January 2 Monday night contest versus the Bengals when his actions helped save Bills safety Damar Hamlin’s life. Hamlin collapsed on the field after suffering cardiac arrest and needed immediate resuscitation and defibrillation. Kellington administered CPR on Hamlin before the defibrillator restored his pulse.

Kellington took immediate action administering CPR and it's a major reason why Hamlin is still alive today. Dr. William Knight IV, who treated Hamlin at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, praised Kellington and the Bills training staff for their heroic actions.


“We cannot credit their team enough,” Knight said, noting that Hamlin needed “immediate bystander CPR, which ... rarely ever happens."

"There are injuries occasionally that happen on sports fields, be it in football or others, but it is incredibly rare to have something be this serious (and) that quickly recognized," Knight said. "Meeting the standard of what we would expect in that scenario is what has allowed us to be able to discuss these good outcomes today."

Bills head coach Sean McDermott also praised Kellington at a press conference.

“For an assistant to find himself at that position and needing to take the action that he did and step up and take charge like he did … is nothing short of amazing,” McDermott said. “The courage that took … talk about a real leader, a real hero, in saving Damar’s life, and I just admire his strength.”


One week after his horrifying collapse, Hamlin was discharged from the University of Cincinnati Medical Center on Monday, January 9 to continue his recovery at a hospital in Buffalo, New York.

Some football fans on Twitter believe that Kellington should be given the NFL’s highest honor, an induction into the Hall of Fame for his heroics. The idea makes a lot of sense. It’s one thing to achieve greatness on the field or in the front office, but saving someone’s life puts Kellington on a whole new level of achievement.

Currently, there are 362 members of the NFL Hall of Fame which includes former players, coaches and front-office people, but a medical staffer has never been inducted. If the NFL acted fast, there’s still time for Kellington to be inducted in 2023.

Players usually have to wait a minimum of five years after retirement to be inducted into the Hall of Fame but there is no waiting period for those who have contributed to the league off the field.

The NFL should announce the latest list of people who will be enshrined in the coming days, leading up to an induction ceremony at Super Bowl 57. To honor Kellington shortly after his amazing act would be a wonderful display of respect by the NFL at a time when player health is top of mind for players and fans.

Kellington took immediate action to help save a player’s life. The least the NFL can do to repay him is to give him the honor he’s due without hesitation.