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A viral video from a Little League game has people celebrating good sportsmanship.

Youth sports have gotten more intensely competitive, to the point where overeager parents and coaches have to regularly be reminded to take it down a notch. So when humanity takes precedence over team rivalries, it's extra heartwarming.

And considering how many "kids these days" laments we see coming from older generations, it's also heartening to see kids showing excellent character qualities when no one directly asked them to.

A viral video from a Little League baseball game is giving us a nice dose of both—good sportsmanship and basic human kindness from two players from opposing teams.

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This article originally appeared on 04.12.21


In all sports, competition can get fierce, especially at the professional level. But two young baseball fans showed us this weekend that sports are really all about fun and connection first with a beautiful show of sportsmanship, kindness, and gratitude.

It happened at a game between division rivals, the Philadephia Phillies and the Atlanta Braves, at Truist Park in Atlanta Saturday night. Joshua, a young Phillies fan, happened to be sitting near the spot where Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman landed a home run in the top of the ninth. Joshua didn't quite manage to catch the ball in his glove, and it fell down into the bullpen. When someone grabbed it and tossed it up to him, he missed that catch, too—twice. Cameras caught him and his dad in a funny exchange, as Joshua got some light, good-natured ribbing from his old man.

But that wasn't the moment that really caught people's attention. Instead of keeping the home run ball for himself, Joshua took it over to a young Braves fan who was wearing a Freeman jersey and gave it to him. After excitedly showing the prized ball to his dad, the boy went over to thank Joshua and his dad.

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Pride nights at major sporting events have become as American as apple pie.

Major League Baseball has made huge strides in recent years in recognizing LGBTQ fans and players. Only the Angels and the Yankees haven't yet held Pride events. But with the Angels announcing plans to host Pride Night in June 2019, the sea change is almost complete.

It's a rapidly accelerating culture of acceptance for a sport that as recently as 2015 faced backlash from fans in one city that hosted its first Pride night. But even that story had a positive ending. The Chicago Cubs are believed to have held the first Pride Night in 2001 and are one of at least 11 teams to sell official Pride merchandise at games.

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Cassidy Warner is 10 years old, and like many youngsters, experiences bullying at her school.

She shared her story — all too relatable to anyone who's been made to feel unwelcome for who they are — in a powerful video on Facebook. In it, she holds up a series of papers with handwritten messages for the world.

As requested, everyone wanted me to repost... This is a video my daughter Cassidy posted orginally from her own Facebook page, her caption said " please everyone help share my story about being bullied not only for me but for everyone" Her story reached 22k views before the Scranton School Dirstict contacted Facebook and her facebook got shut down because she's not 13 and of age to have a facebooK. She was threatened by the principal to remove the video or he was going to report it and he was successful. But this does not stop here, I will be my daughters voice I will share her story and I hope others will share too, this Isn't about the shares or views or if it goes viral its about spreading awareness although seeing that smile on Cassidy's face each time the number of views and shares got larger that was everything. Shes upset she has to start all over but let's do this for her....please share her story let's put that smile back on her face!!!

"My name is Cassidy. I am 10 years old. I go to John Adams Elementary School. I am in 4th grade. I started getting bullied in 1st grade. One day during recess a group of kids grabbed my purse off of a teacher, and spit on it and me. The group of kids always come up to me during recess, trying to fight me. They hit me, kicked me, pulled my hair, pushed me, stepped on me, spit on me… Kids don’t even want to go near me. Wherever I sit at the lunch table, the kids get up. They threaten to kill me, 2nd they tell me to kill myself. They also spilt milk all over my jacket. They also call me names. There’s four of them and only 1 of me. The principal doesn’t do anything. I feel so alone, I feel like I have no one. It hurts. This is my story… Stop bullying! Not just for me, for other kids, to[o]. Please share my story! Thank you for watching!"

Cassidy's video was deleted from Facebook, but her mom, Jenn Slater, then uploaded it to her own personal page. Since then, Cassidy has appeared on CNN to share her anti-bullying message and even got a warm note from actor Hugh Jackman urging her to "never stop asking for help."

Nearly two weeks later, Cassidy got another big message of support from a very unexpected group of people: the New York Yankees.

In a video posted to the team's Twitter account, the Yankees responded to Cassidy's story with a series of handwritten notes of their own. Many of the team's stars, such as Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton, and CC Sabathia took part in the heartwarming video.

"Dear Cassidy. My name is CC Sabathia and I play baseball for the New York Yankees. My teammates and I wanted you to know that we care about you. We know sharing your story must have been difficult, but you showed courage and strength, and inspired us to reach out to you. We may be older than you, we may be taller than you, but we want you to know that we look up to you. You are not alone! Count the New York Yankees among your friends! You can sit next to us at lunch any time!!! In fact, we are saving a seat for you at our lunch table in the clubhouse. Bullying is wrong. We won’t stand for it! No one should ever be made to feel bad about who they are. We need to care for each other. There are 25 of us on this team and we all got your back. See you soon!"

Like Cassidy said, this is about more than just her; it's about all bullying.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 28% of students in grades 6-12 experience bullying, and more than 70% of students have witnessed it.

HHS has a comprehensive guide for parents to help teach their kids about bullying (and how to prevent it) on its website. Its tips include educating kids about what bullying is, making this an ongoing dialogue, encouraging kids to engage in hobbies, and instilling in them the values of kindness and respect.

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