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Students showcase a ridiculous solution to a really ridiculous gun law.

Student Body Armor is a joke, but gun violence isn't.

Students showcase a ridiculous solution to a really ridiculous gun law.

Did you know that in several states, pretty much anyone can stroll into their 9 a.m. freshman economics class armed to the teeth?

In September 2016, professors at the University of Texas-Austin found empty bullet casings around campus along with menacing notes meant to mock anti-gun advocates, reading "Triggered?" and "In the land of the pigs, the butcher is king. Oink... Oink... Oink." That same month, at another Texas college, one student accidentally fired a gun in one of the dorms.

Not only are there questions about whether these campus carry laws actually work in the "the only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun" sense, but there's also an intellectual cost to life on campus where you never know when what started as a healthy debate could turn deadly.


The brilliant minds behind the viral "cocks not glocks" protest have released a funny new video addressing their concerns with campus carry.

Hawking "Student Body Armor," a (fake) new product with safety and school spirit in mind, the video takes a tongue-in-cheek approach to fighting back against laws that would allow weapons on college campuses.

According to Cocks Not Glocks founder Jessica Jin in an interview with The Guardian, the goal of Student Body Armor is to use "absurd branding that makes people just slow down for a second and question what they value as acceptable in day-to-day life."

In that case: mission accomplished.

There are two things each of us can do right now to push back on the spread of campus carry laws.

The first is to get in touch with state legislators and voice concern about campus carry. Campus carry laws already exist in Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. If calling from one of those states, push your legislators to seek repeal. If elsewhere, urge them to oppose those laws moving forward.

The second thing you can do, if you're a high schooler or anyone else considering where to attend college and you decide against a particular school because of the school or state's gun policy, is let the school's admissions office know why you didn't choose their school.

GIF from Student Body Armor/YouTube.

Because you shouldn't have to wear student body armor just to feel safe when you're going to class.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


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I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

The epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in America is one of the country's most disturbing trends. A major reason it persists is because it's rarely discussed outside of the native community.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, murder is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women under age 19.

Women who live on some reservations face rates of violence that are as much as ten times higher than the national average.

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