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Students showcase a ridiculous solution to a really ridiculous gun law.

Student Body Armor is a joke, but gun violence isn't.

Students showcase a ridiculous solution to a really ridiculous gun law.

Did you know that in several states, pretty much anyone can stroll into their 9 a.m. freshman economics class armed to the teeth?

In September 2016, professors at the University of Texas-Austin found empty bullet casings around campus along with menacing notes meant to mock anti-gun advocates, reading "Triggered?" and "In the land of the pigs, the butcher is king. Oink... Oink... Oink." That same month, at another Texas college, one student accidentally fired a gun in one of the dorms.

Not only are there questions about whether these campus carry laws actually work in the "the only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun" sense, but there's also an intellectual cost to life on campus where you never know when what started as a healthy debate could turn deadly.


The brilliant minds behind the viral "cocks not glocks" protest have released a funny new video addressing their concerns with campus carry.

Hawking "Student Body Armor," a (fake) new product with safety and school spirit in mind, the video takes a tongue-in-cheek approach to fighting back against laws that would allow weapons on college campuses.

According to Cocks Not Glocks founder Jessica Jin in an interview with The Guardian, the goal of Student Body Armor is to use "absurd branding that makes people just slow down for a second and question what they value as acceptable in day-to-day life."

In that case: mission accomplished.

There are two things each of us can do right now to push back on the spread of campus carry laws.

The first is to get in touch with state legislators and voice concern about campus carry. Campus carry laws already exist in Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. If calling from one of those states, push your legislators to seek repeal. If elsewhere, urge them to oppose those laws moving forward.

The second thing you can do, if you're a high schooler or anyone else considering where to attend college and you decide against a particular school because of the school or state's gun policy, is let the school's admissions office know why you didn't choose their school.

GIF from Student Body Armor/YouTube.

Because you shouldn't have to wear student body armor just to feel safe when you're going to class.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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The year 2018 was a pivotal one in the produce industry, the Red Delicious was supplanted as the most popular apple in America by the sweeter, crisper Gala.

It was only a matter of time. The Red Delicious looked the part of the king of the apples with its deep red, flawless skin. But its interior was soft, mealy, and pretty bland. The Red Delicious was popular for growers because its skin hid any bruises and it was desired by consumers because of its appearance.

But these days it's having a hard time competing with the delectable crunch provided by the Gala, honeycrisp, and Fuji.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."