Singer slams Trump’s ‘scary time for men’ comment with hilarious response.

Donald Trump has a long history of supporting men accused of sexual assault. He’s done so by mocking women that have come forward with allegations while treating the men as victims.

“It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of,” Trump said, in support of then-Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh.

Kavanugh has been accused of multiple acts of sexual misconduct from attempted rape to exposing himself.


"This is a very, very — this is a very difficult time. What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice,” he told reporters on the White House lawn on October 2.

“It's a very scary situation where you’re guilty until proven innocent,” Trump said, not realizing that Kavanaugh wasn’t on trial, but going through a confirmation process. “You could be somebody that was perfect your entire life and somebody could accuse you of something.”

Trump has been accused by nearly two dozen women of sexual misconduct.

Dancer, choreographer, and singer-songwriter Lynzy Lab destroyed Trump’s comments with a hilarious and poignant song called “A Scary Time.”

The ukulele-backed tune calls attention to the the many reasons women have to fear men, from being raped to belittled for speaking out about abuse.

It's also a great explainer on male privilege.

“A Scary Time” by Lynzy Lab

I can’t walk to my car late at night while on the phone

I can’t open up my windows when I’m home alone

I can’t go to a bar without a chaperone

And I can’t wear a mini skirt if its the only one i own

I can’t use public transportation after 7 pm

I can’t be brutally honest when you slide into my DMs

I can’t go to the club just to dance with my friends

And i can’t ever leave my drink unattended

But it sure is a scary time for boys

Yeah gentlemen! Band together, make some noise

It’s really tough when your reputation’s on the line

And any woman you’ve assaulted could turn up anytime

Yeah, it sure is a scary time for guys

Can’t speak to any women or look them in the eyes

It’s so confusing, is it rape or is it just being nice?

So inconvenient that you even have to think twice

I can’t live in an apartment if it's on the first floor  

I can’t be wearing silk pajamas when I answer the door

I can’t have another drink even if I want more

I can’t make you feel invalid, unseen, or ignored

I can’t jog around the city with headphones on my ears

I can’t speak out against my rapist after 35 years

I can’t be taken seriously if i'm holding back tears

and I can’t ever speak earnestly about all my fears

But it sure is a scary time for dudes

Can’t text a girl repeatedly asking for nudes

Can’t make her have sex when she’s not in the mood

And what gives her the right to give you attitude?

Yeah, it sure is a scary time for men

Girls like to act like you’re to blame and they’re the victims

Her dress was short and she was drunk, she’s not so innocent

Thank god your dad’s the judge and you won’t be convicted

Oh wait...that’s right…


It’s not such a scary time for boys

They’ve always had the upper hand, they’ve always had a choice

It’s time for women to rise up,    

Use our collective voice

The day to vote’s November 6, so let’s go make some noise
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