Singer slams Trump’s ‘scary time for men’ comment with hilarious response.

Donald Trump has a long history of supporting men accused of sexual assault. He’s done so by mocking women that have come forward with allegations while treating the men as victims.

“It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of,” Trump said, in support of then-Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh.

Kavanugh has been accused of multiple acts of sexual misconduct from attempted rape to exposing himself.


"This is a very, very — this is a very difficult time. What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice,” he told reporters on the White House lawn on October 2.

“It's a very scary situation where you’re guilty until proven innocent,” Trump said, not realizing that Kavanaugh wasn’t on trial, but going through a confirmation process. “You could be somebody that was perfect your entire life and somebody could accuse you of something.”

Trump has been accused by nearly two dozen women of sexual misconduct.

Dancer, choreographer, and singer-songwriter Lynzy Lab destroyed Trump’s comments with a hilarious and poignant song called “A Scary Time.”

The ukulele-backed tune calls attention to the the many reasons women have to fear men, from being raped to belittled for speaking out about abuse.

It's also a great explainer on male privilege.

“A Scary Time” by Lynzy Lab

I can’t walk to my car late at night while on the phone

I can’t open up my windows when I’m home alone

I can’t go to a bar without a chaperone

And I can’t wear a mini skirt if its the only one i own

I can’t use public transportation after 7 pm

I can’t be brutally honest when you slide into my DMs

I can’t go to the club just to dance with my friends

And i can’t ever leave my drink unattended

But it sure is a scary time for boys

Yeah gentlemen! Band together, make some noise

It’s really tough when your reputation’s on the line

And any woman you’ve assaulted could turn up anytime

Yeah, it sure is a scary time for guys

Can’t speak to any women or look them in the eyes

It’s so confusing, is it rape or is it just being nice?

So inconvenient that you even have to think twice

I can’t live in an apartment if it's on the first floor  

I can’t be wearing silk pajamas when I answer the door

I can’t have another drink even if I want more

I can’t make you feel invalid, unseen, or ignored

I can’t jog around the city with headphones on my ears

I can’t speak out against my rapist after 35 years

I can’t be taken seriously if i'm holding back tears

and I can’t ever speak earnestly about all my fears

But it sure is a scary time for dudes

Can’t text a girl repeatedly asking for nudes

Can’t make her have sex when she’s not in the mood

And what gives her the right to give you attitude?

Yeah, it sure is a scary time for men

Girls like to act like you’re to blame and they’re the victims

Her dress was short and she was drunk, she’s not so innocent

Thank god your dad’s the judge and you won’t be convicted

Oh wait...that’s right…


It’s not such a scary time for boys

They’ve always had the upper hand, they’ve always had a choice

It’s time for women to rise up,    

Use our collective voice

The day to vote’s November 6, so let’s go make some noise
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

This article originally appeared on 11.21.16


Photographer Katie Joy Crawford had been battling anxiety for 10 years when she decided to face it straight on by turning the camera lens on herself.

In 2015, Upworthy shared Crawford's self-portraits and our readers responded with tons of empathy. One person said, "What a wonderful way to express what words cannot." Another reader added, "I think she hit the nail right on the head. It's like a constant battle with yourself. I often feel my emotions battling each other."

So we wanted to go back and talk to the photographer directly about this soul-baring project.

Keep Reading Show less
True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."