She tries playing the video game using a female avatar. What happens next is way too realistic.

Thank you, Amy Schumer, for one of the most on-point comedy sketches of the year.

In less than three minutes, this sketch does three important things:

1. It puts military-grade laser focus on a serious problem.


A survey revealed an estimated 26,000 cases of rape against women and men in the military in 2012 alone. Only 1 in 7 of those cases were reported, resulting in a total of only 238 convictions. That was just one year. It's been happening for decades.

The military's internal process for rape cases makes it harder for survivors to recover. Two-thirds of those who file reports experience retaliation by fellow soldiers and find themselves on trial, rather than their attackers.

What happens in the game — Schumer's female avatar is raped and ostracized as her attacker rises through the ranks — isn't even a stretch from reality. Then there's her boyfriend, who seems incredulous to the thought that she'd be treated unfairly by the game (read: system), simply because he'd never been. Sure, it's a comedy bit about a video game, but in the real world of the military, this is how people are treated.

Check out "The Invisible War" to learn more and to get involved.

2. It spectacularly calls out misogyny in the gamer world.

If you're a gamer who thinks women have no place in gaming and that it's your inalienable human right to play games that demean women, here's a quick news flash: Women make up almost half of all gamers. And the future of the industry will continue to be shaped by women. So get used to 'em.

And more importantly, stop being an asshole.

3. It proves yet again that, yes, women can be funny.

And if you still don't see that, then...

In fact, Schumer does what so many comics before her have tried and failed at: making a rape joke that works. Instead of trivializing a horrific experience, this sketch exposes an entire system that does nothing to prevent people — service men and women in this case — from being victimized in one of the most traumatic possible ways.

So I'll say it again: Thank you, Amy Schumer.

More