The Redskins are finally getting a new name and a lot of the suggestions are honestly great
via Scott Challeen / Twitter and DC Sports Experience / Instagram

In a move that was a long time coming, the Washington Redskins announced that after 87 years the team is finally ditching its culturally offensive name.

"Today, we are announcing we will be retiring the Redskins name and logo upon completion of this review," the team said in a statement Monday.

"That review has begun in earnest," it said. "As part of this process, we want to keep our sponsors, fans and community apprised of our thinking as we go forward."


The move comes after years of public outcry over a name that team owner Dan Snyder had stubbornly said he will not change. "We'll never change the name," he told USA Today in 2013. "It's that simple. NEVER — you can use caps."

But money talks in the NFL. And after the death of George Floyd and the ensuing protests for social justice around the country, several of the team's corporate partners threatened to cut business ties with the franchise.

FedEx paid $205 million for naming rights to the team's stadium in 1999 and "communicated to the team in Washington our request that they change the team name."

Now that the ugly cloud hanging over the team has been lifted, fans are suggesting new names for Washington's team and a lot of them are worth considering.

The team has yet to make a decision but Snyder and head coach Ron Rivera are "working closely to develop a new name and design approach."

Here are some of the most popular new names for the team.

Redtails

Yahoo News polled its readers about the team's new name and the most popular, with 28% of the vote, was Redtails. The name is a reference to the Tuskegee Airmen, a group of African-American fighter pilots who bravely fought in World War II.

The nickname Redtails comes from the crimson tail on the wings of their planes.

This new name would honor the military, per Rivera's wishes, and allow the team to keep its burgundy and gold colors. The name would also allow the team to keep its hashtag, "HHTR" which currently stands for Hail to the Redskins.



Warriors

D.C. radio host Kevin Sheehan said during a podcast he had it "on pretty good authority" that Warriors will be the team's new name.

"I don't think that's a reveal by any stretch," Sheehan said. "I think people do know that the Redskins have marked Washington Warriors just in case and that this has been the way. I would bet big money on the Warriors being the new name for the football team."

Traditionally, teams with Warrior in their name have used some type of Native American imagery for their logos which may dissuade the team from going in this direction.

Another reason to avoid the name is one of the most popular sports franchises in the country are the NBA's Golden State Warriors.


They could also go next level and become the Ultimate Warriors.


Red Wolves

The red wolf is a canine native to the southeastern and south-central United States, so it geographically makes sense and allows the team to keep its colors.

"It is an endangered species. It allows us to keep the 'HTTR,'" former Washington cornerback, Fred Smoot, said. "It allows us to keep the burgundy and gold. It allows us to have some crazy uniforms. Like I said before, I can see 80,000 people in FedEx Field howling like wolves after Chase Young gets a sack to win a game."

The name is also unique because there aren't any other NFL teams with canine imagery.

The fan-designed logos are pretty impressive, too.




Redhawks

Native American activists have suggested the team change its name to the Redhawks. "We created this action to show the NFL and the Washington Football franchise how easy, popular and powerful changing the name could be," a Native American activist group said according to The Sporting News.

A Redhawk definitely sounds like a fierce competitor but there is already a team called the Seahawks so it may not be original enough. Although, in the MLB, there are two teams named after colors of socks, so anything is possible.

Washington Generals

This may fulfill Rivera's request that the new name honor the military, but let's be clear there was already a team called the Washington Generals and they are the worst franchise in sports history.

The Generals were the team that got whooped on by the Globetrotters for over 60 years before folding in 2015. Although records are sketchy, it's believed that the Generals have only won somewhere between three to six games and lost 16,000.


Washington Senators

Here is another terrible idea. First of all, given the current climate in the nation's capital, being known as a senator isn't really a compliment.

Secondly, Major League Baseball's Washington Senators only won the pennant three times in their 60-plus year history. Coming off a 3 - 13 season, the Redskins probably don't want to start off 2020 with Senators on their backs.



Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less

Part of the reason why the O.J. Simpson trial still captures our attention 25 years later is because it's filled with complexities - and complexities on top of complexities at that. Kim Kardashian West finally opened up about her experience during the O.J. Simpson trial on the third season of David Letterman's Netflix show My Next Guest Needs No Introduction, adding another layer to the situation.

Kardashian, who was 14 at the time, said she was close to Simpson before the trial, calling him "Uncle O.J." The whole Kardashian-Jenner brood even went on a family vacation in Mexico with the Simpsons just weeks before Nicole's murder.


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less
via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash

We've heard that character is on the ballot this election—but also that policy matters more than personality. We've heard that integrity and honesty matter—but also that we're electing the leader of a nation, not the leader of a Boy Scout troop.

How much a candidate's character matters has been a matter of debate for decades. But one of the odd juxtapositions of the Trump era is that arguably the most historically immoral, character-deficient candidate has been embraced by the evangelical Christian right, who tout morality more than most. Trump won the right's "moral majority" vote by pushing conservative policies, and there is a not-so-small percentage of "one issue" voters—the issue being abortion—who are willing to overlook any and all manner of sin for someone who says they want to "protect the unborn."

So when a prominent, staunchly pro-life, conservative Christian pastor comes out with a biblical argument that basically says "Yeah, no, the benefit doesn't outweigh the cost," it makes people sit up and listen.


Keep Reading Show less