It hasn't been a great year for tolerance. But Daianna Karaian has a plan.

As an American living abroad in the U.K., Karaian has was hit hard emotionally by both the Brexit referendum and the U.S. election.

"Tears have definitely been shed but quickly replaced by a resolve to do something," she says. "If ever there was a time for people to make things better, this is it."


Her solution? Little paper cards, hidden in stores, coffee shops, train cars, or wherever. The cards say "A Place For" followed by a blank space.

Immigrants. Muslims. Cat lovers. Anything goes.

Photo by Robbie Dale, used with permission.

Folded inside, finders get instructions for how and why they can print their own cards.

Photo by Robbie Dale, used with permission.

It's a simple way to show others that no matter what's going on in the world, there are people who accept them. At the very least, it's a small injection of joy in a stranger's day.

Karaian is calling it a "guerrilla campaign for tolerance," and now, others are joining in.

First in London and then all over the world, people have been using these cards and marking places for the brave...

...for friendly rivalry...

...for sharing and kindness...

...for students...

...or even just for a quiet moment.

Karaian has placed many of the cards herself, and she says her favorite part is watching people find them.

She says they pick up the cards curiously, cautiously at first, like they're passing notes in math class. Then, when they read the card, there's usually a big smile.

And just like that, phase one (brightening their day) is done. From there, Karaian hopes they'll pass the kind notion along.

"There's this sense that this past year has been hell-bent on dividing us," she says. "It's nice to be reminded ... that most of us just want to love and be loved, no matter who you voted for and what you think or what color your skin is or what religion you practice."

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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