Mother posts raw photos of her C-section scar to prove it's not the 'easy way out'
via Engin_Akyurt / Pixabay

There's a bizarre prejudice directed at women who have C-sections to deliver their babies.

They're often asked if they feel they "missed out" on giving birth or are told they took the "easy way out" by having surgery instead of delivering the baby vaginally.

Ask any woman who's had a C-section and she'll tell you, it's no walk in the park.


A C-section is major abdominal surgery that takes around six weeks to completely heal. It carries a long list of potential complications, including: infections, excessive bleeding, blood clots, and uterine ruptures.

Sherri Bayles, a New York City-based certified Lamaze instructor, lactation consultant, and registered nurse, says: "The important thing is to have a healthy baby—it doesn't matter how he gets here."

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Three years ago, Missouri mom Raye Lee attempted to put an end to all of the shaming by posting raw photos of her body after her C-section on Facebook.

It all started when someone told her "Oh. A c-section? So you didn't actually give birth. It must have been nice to take the easy way out like that."

via Facebook

Lee was in labor for 38 excruciating hours before reaching the point whereevery contraction was "literally stopping his heart," she wrote in her post which has since been removed. At that point, her doctors decided it was time for surgery.

"Being told at the beginning that I was displaying great progress and wouldn't need a cesarean section… and then being told that I was being prepped for major abdominal surgery was not a shock at all," she wrote, sarcastically.

"Oh, and that surgery is super easy peasy to recover from."

Her photos show that the surgery was no minor procedure.

via Facebook

Lee describes her surgery as "a completely different experience than I had imagined my son's birth to be."

"When that first nurse asked you to try getting out of bed and the ripping pain of a body cut apart and stitched back together seared through you, you realized the irony of anybody who talks about it being the 'easy way out,'" she wrote.

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She never expected how difficult it would be to recover from the damage done to her core by the surgery.

"You use your core muscles for literally everything... even sitting down," she wrote. "Imagine not being able to use them because they have literally been shredded and mangled by a doctor and not being able to repair them for 6+ weeks because your body has to do it naturally."

But, in the end, for Lee going through the painful surgery was worth the agony.

"I am the strongest woman, that I know," she ended her post. "Not only for myself, but for my beautiful son… and I would honestly go through this every single day just to make sure I am able to see his smiling face."

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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