Police officer buys car seats for single mom instead of giving her ticket during traffic stop
Facebook / Lashae Jackson

Andrella "Lashae" Jackson, a single mom of five, was pulled over by the Milwaukee Police earlier this month for having the wrong registration on her car. But when Officer Zimmerman approached the vehicle, he noticed two small kids in the backseat without car seats. Instead of giving her a ticket, he took it upon himself to help Jackson out during a difficult time.

"I see three kids in the backseat and two are very young. I didn't observe any child restraints or even seat belts and I asked why the kids aren't in car seats. She said she can't afford them at this time," Zimmerman told WTMJ-TV.



Jackson said with bills coming up and winter approaching, she would have to buy coats and boots for her children, so she didn't have the extra money to get new car seats.

"It was hard for me," Jackson told the news station.


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After pulling Jackson over, Zimmerman went to Walmart and bought car seats along with some small items for the kids so she didn't "have to worry about at least part of the situation" she's in. He then installed the car seats for her to make sure her kids were strapped in safely.

"I'm a father myself, I have three kids. I thought of my kids jumping around. What if a car hit them and they flew and got seriously hurt, if not killed?" Zimmerman said.

Jackson "kept saying thank you and the kids kept saying thank you."

"Now, I'm able to finish getting coats," she said. "That saved me 70 something dollars on buying coats and hats and gloves. He's awesome. I really love him. I really appreciate everything he did for me."

The Milwaukee Police Department posted a shout-out to Zimmerman on it's Facebook page, thanking him for "going the extra mile going above and beyond [the] call of duty."

The post received hundreds of comments praising Zimmerman for his kind act.

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"This is an amazing story. Thanks for being a great example of what our police force should look like in situations like this! Pretty damn dope!"

"This is what "To Serve & Protect" is! May God bless you, Officer, for serving & protecting these precious children!"

"Thank you Officer Zimmerman for taking the time and the money you could have saved for your children to give to someone in need for their children. Keep up the great humanitarian work."

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.