Melissa McCarthy confronted a critic who said actresses should always be pretty in movies.

He told her she was only a good actress when she looked attractive. She asked if he would tell his daughter that.

When comedian Melissa McCarthy met one of her critics, she didn't back down. She faced him head on and calmly explained why making those remarks are so hurtful, especially to young girls.

"Every time you write stuff like that," she told him, "every young girl in this country reads that and gets a little [part of themselves] chipped away."


But good news! She thinks it actually got through to him:

This double standard has followed all sorts of comedic actresses throughout the entertainment business.

McCarthy is one of the funniest voices of our generation. She's even earned an Academy Award nomination for "Bridesmaids" — something very rare for a comedic actor. Unfortunately, as a woman, her performances are often critiqued on what she looks like. She's not alone.

Here are a couple of very revealing quotes from other women facing similar battles in the industry:

The first comes from Carol Burnett.

All GIFs via Giphy.

When she proposed the TV classic "The Carol Burnett Show" to the powers that be, they didn't think a woman could carry her own variety show:

"Yeah, Carol, you know, it's really, variety is a man's game. ... It's Gleason, Milton Berle. It's Dean Martin. It's Sid Caesar. You know, women. We've got this great sitcom we'd love you to do called 'Here's Agnes.'

Can't you just see it? Heeeeere's Agnes!" — Carol Burnett

The other from Mindy Kaling.

A woman from The Hollywood Reporter asked her what is the most asinine question people have said to you?

"'I think it's great that you deign to be on camera when you're so unappealing!'

I don't ... I mean, my fans and friends on the show are lovely and wonderful, and it moves me to tears to interact with them. It's always ... it's a backhanded thing people who actually identify as feminists who will say something that you're like, 'That is a very rude thing to say! How dare you!'" — Mindy Kaling

It's true. People think they can just say whatever they want to a famous person. It gets even worse when you're a famous woman.

It's not only up to women like Melissa McCarthy, Carol Burnett, and Mindy Kaling to point out when people have gone too far.

It's up to regular folks like you and me to point out when people are out of line, anywhere we hear it. Take Melissa's word for it:

"It's easy to take a swipe. And I'm like, just go the other way. Build it up. ... Put a little love and kindness in the world, and it does good things when you do that."

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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'Merry Christmas' on YouTube.

The world must have been—mostly—good this year. Because Elton John and Ed Sheeran have teamed up to gift us all with a brand new Christmas single.

The song, aptly named “Merry Christmas,” is a perfect blend of silly and sweet that’s cheery, bright and just a touch bizarre.

Created with the holiday spirit in every way, it has whimsical snowball fights, snow angels (basically all the snow things), festive sweaters, iconic throwbacks and twinkling lights galore. Plus all profits from the tune are dedicated to two charities: the Ed Sheeran Suffolk Music Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

I personally don’t know which is more of a highlight: Ed Sheeran channeling his inner-Mariah, performing a faux sexy dance in a leg revealing Santa outfit, or him flying through the air with a giant Frosty the Snowman … who seems to be sporting glasses similar to Elton’s. Are we meant to believe that Elton is the Snowman? This music video even has mystery.
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