More

Kelly Ripa reveals why she feels weird accepting an award for supporting LGBT rights.

"Quite frankly, I should be giving this award to all of you." — Kelly Ripa

Kelly Ripa reveals why she feels weird accepting an award for supporting LGBT rights.

Kelly Ripa won GLAAD's 2015 Excellence in Media Award for being a prominent, vocal supporter of LGBT rights.

But instead of the usual acceptance speech platitudes, thank yous, and humblebrags, Ripa spent significant time talking about about how winning the award made her feel ... a little odd.

Because you shouldn't get extra credit for, as Ripa puts it, "treating people like people."


<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span><span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

Heck. Yeah.

Ripa deserves credit for using her platform to advocate for equality.

She's done great work with a foundation that supports LGBT youth who have been abandoned by their parents and communities, and she produces a reality show on Logo, which helps ensure that LGBT folks stay represented on TV.

But she knows that should be the baseline for someone in her position.

It's not especially admirable to advocate for treating people equally. It's not "going above and beyond" to believe that all people deserve to love who they want and live without having to worry about discrimination. People shouldn't need to get an award for treating all fellow humans with dignity and respect.

It's just what people should do. Period. Full stop.

Which is why Ripa is 100% on point when she tells the audience...

As Canada's women's soccer team prepares for its gold medal match against Sweden this week in Tokyo, it also prepares to make history as the first Olympic team to have an openly transgender, non-binary athlete win a medal at the games.

Quinn, the 25-year-old midfielder, announced their non-binary identity on social media last September, adopting they/them pronouns and a singular name. Quinn said they'd been living openly as a transgender person with their loved ones, but this was their first time coming out publicly.

"I want to be visible to queer folks who don't see people like them on their feed. I know it saved my life years ago," they wrote. "I want to challenge cis folks ( if you don't know what cis means, that's probably you!!!) to be better allies."

Keep Reading Show less