+
upworthy
Pop Culture

Just in time for Halloween, people share the worst candies. Here are the top 10 to avoid.

The new Crunch bar recipe tastes 'like chocolate lies!'

Halloween; Halloween candy; worst candy

Apparently, not all candies are created equal.

It's spooky season and with that generally comes more candy than anyone could comfortably eat in one sitting. There are some candies that people think should never leave the factory—more than 25,000 people responded to a question on Reddit, "What is the worst candy?" And let me be the first to tell you that people had some big feelings.


Candy is something that most people enjoy, but preferences vary widely. Some people love black licorice and think it's the best-tasting candy out there, while others would gag at the smell of it. So, it makes sense that a list of candy that people hate is bound to be subjective based on people's differing tastes. But there are some candies that rise to the top of the throw it in the trash and light it on fire list, so stick around to find out what candy to avoid this year, in no particular order.

Photo by Thibault Penin on Unsplash
1. Crunch bars are no longer a favorite

Yeah, Crunch is the candy bar from your childhood that used to cut your tongue or roof of your mouth because you insisted on sucking the chocolate off of the rice crispy bits. It seems that the formula was changed a few years ago for no good reason, according to the people on Reddit. One person described the change as a "crime against humanity," while another who excitedly bought one after years of being unable to find them described the candy as "chocolate lies."

2. Wax lips and vampire teeth

The collective jury seems to be out on if you're actually supposed to eat those things, but I distinctly remember being told they were gum and they kind of tasted like maybe they could be—if you didn't know what gum tasted like. Whether you were supposed to eat them or not, chewing on them tastes, well, like wax.

Canva

3. Any object with fake M&Ms inside

I'm not sure you see so much of this around Halloween, but you definitely see it around Christmas. Clear plastic candy cane tubes filled with fake M&Ms that one person said "taste like chocolate lentils" and ended the statement with expletives. It's safe to say that they have some strong feelings.

4. Whatever those orange and black wrapped candies are

No one knows what they're called but the hatred was unifying. Is it peanut butter flavored or flavored like molasses? There was some disagreement there, but the consensus was that nobody liked them and they should immediately be thrown into the sun. If you buy those candies to give out to your trick or treaters, just know that you'll have a bunch of 8-year-olds figuring out how to string together swear words just to cuss you out in their heads.

Wikicommons

5. Jujubes are not for actual teeth

According to one commenter, Jujubes are the generic much harder and less tasty version of Dots, and I can see that. Someone else had a theory about them being invented by dentists to drum up more business, but seriously, those things could yank out a tooth while anyone tried to chew them. They're brutal but if you're looking to make your jaw line look like it was getting in reps at the gym, then these are the candies for you.

6. The actual devil in candy form, Good & Plenty

Oh, there are plenty, and I mean plenty, but they certainly aren't good. The thought of those purple and white coated candies makes some people want to rip out their taste buds. A few Reddit users came up with other names for the candy nightmares are made of. One person said they should be called "bad and too much," while another user preferred the name "awful and abundant." Someone else describes the taste as "NyQuil flavored chews" and that's a pretty accurate description.

Canva

7. The corn that everyone loves to hate, Candy Corn

You knew it was coming. Candy Corn is probably the most controversial holiday candy next to Peeps. People either love or hate them, there is no in between. But the gathered thoughts of commenters under this particular entry is that Candy Corn deserves its own special place at the bottom of a burning trash pile. Poor Candy Corn, I love you, maybe that's enough to soothe the sting from the collective distain.

8. This oldie, teaching kids bad habits, Candy Cigarettes

Yes, they still make these and they're still just as chalky and gross as ever. Who thought "I know what will be a great candy— cigarettes!" and had enough eyes on it to approve the product for advertisement and consumption by children. One of the commenters joked that they were still struggling with their candy cigarette habit and had to turn to candy patches to help with their addiction.

Flickr

9. While not a Halloween candy per se, Circus Peanuts kept popping up

What is it about these orange peanuts that gets people in a tizzy? One person actually described them as "biting into foam" and now I feel like I need to try some again to accurately assess if this is in fact true. The comments under Circus Peanuts were just filled with one-word reactions like "gross" and "nasty" so it seems pretty safe to assume not many people are fans of these orange foamy peanuts.

10. Dots and the stupid paper they come on

Dots are cute in theory but when you try to eat those little suckers you get a mouth full of paper that rips off along with the candy. There really isn't any separating the candy from the paper no matter how carefully you try. The only sure method of getting paper-free candy is to pull the candy off and lick the stuck-on paper until it dissolves. Eh, I guess you're still getting the paper that way, just in a less offensive way.

Of course, there may be things on this list that you absolutely love. I'm just the messenger. Take it up with the thousands of people who think you're wrong. Just kidding … taste is subjective. Enjoy whatever candy you want this Halloween and remember to pass out the good stuff for the trick or treaters.

Joy

Sorry, Labradors. After 31 years, America has a new favorite dog.

The American Kennel Club has crowned a new favorite.

via Pixabay

A sad-looking Labrador Retriever

The sweet-faced, loveable Labrador Retriever is no longer America’s favorite dog breed. The breed best known for having a heart of gold has been replaced by the smaller, more urban-friendly French Bulldog.

According to the American Kennel Club, for the past 31 years, the Labrador Retriever was America’s favorite dog, but it was eclipsed in 2022 by the Frenchie. The rankings are based on nearly 716,500 dogs newly registered in 2022, of which about 1 in 7 were Frenchies. Around 108,000 French Bulldogs were recorded in the U.S. in 2022, surpassing Labrador Retrievers by over 21,000.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Gen Z is allegedly ‘aging like milk’ and this TikTok star’s proof has people rolling

The 26-year-old’s encounter with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson was too hilarious.


Jordan Howlett is 26, but people always think he's in his 40s.

Every generation eventually reaches the point where they realize they're aging, but apparently Gen Z is hitting that milestone a lot earlier than most. Despite—or perhaps because of—growing up during the biggest anti-aging beauty product boom the world has ever seen, the young folks born between 1997 and 2012 are gaining a reputation for looking old before their time.

How can anyone who is younger than 27 look old, you may ask? It's a valid question. According to one cosmetic doctor, young adults are engaging in anti-aging interventions like fillers and Botox prematurely, which ironically is making them "age" faster. Another culprit could be that smoking and vaping have taken hold of Gen Z in a way that their millennial predecessors generally managed to avoid.

According to Jordan Howlett, better known as Jordan the Stallion on TikTok, it's "mainly because of the stress" that Gen Z is "aging like milk." But it's Howlett's own personal anecdotes of looking older than his age as a Gen Zer that has people marveling—and laughing out loud.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Younger people are admitting baby boomers got these 17 things right

"Kids shouldn't be on phones or iPads all the time. It makes them weird."

Baby boomers didn't get everything wrong.

In recent years, baby boomers have often been the target of criticism from younger generations. The most common accusations are that boomers are selfish and don’t care about leaving ample resources (whether financial or environmental) to subsequent generations.

They also come under fire for not being able to acknowledge that it was easier for people of their generation to come of age when things were more affordable and life was a lot less competitive.

However, we should also understand that many of today’s problems are not the boomers’ doing, especially when it comes to the issues that stem from entitled children and technology run amok. In hindsight, there’s something to be said about the importance that boomers placed on self-reliance, letting kids be kids and having a healthy skepticism towards technology.

Keep ReadingShow less

Portland 'Ice Tok' is making social media erupt with laughter

There are actually some people that choose to live where the air hurts your face. Sure, snow and icicles can be pretty to watch on television or even from the comfort of your own toasty living room. But it's much less serene when you have to get out in it to do non-exciting activities like go to school or work.

The people of Portland, Oregon have been dealing with the beauty of mother nature up close and personal–sometimes a little too close. After an ice storm trapped them in the house for days, people started having to venture outdoors and the results are hilarious. Residents of the iced-in city have been uploading videos of themselves and others looking a lot like a new born deer attempting to take its first steps.

Keep ReadingShow less
Health

8 nontraditional empathy cards that are unlike any you've ever seen. They're perfect!

Because sincerity and real talk are important during times of medical crisis.

True compassion.

When someone you know gets seriously ill, it's not always easy to come up with the right words to say or to find the right card to give.

Emily McDowell — a former ad agency creative director and the woman behind the Los Angeles-based greeting card and textile company Emily McDowell Studio — knew all too well what it was like to be on the receiving end of uncomfortable sentiments.

At the age of 24, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 Hodgkin's lymphoma. She went into remission after nine months of chemo and has remained cancer-free since, but she received her fair share of misplaced, but well-meaning, wishes before that.

On her webpage introducing the awesome cards you're about to see, she shared,

"The most difficult part of my illness wasn't losing my hair, or being erroneously called 'sir' by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn't know what to say or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it."

Her experience inspired Empathy Cards — not quite "get well soon" and not quite "sympathy," they were created so "the recipients of these cards [can] feel seen, understood, and loved."

Scroll down to read these sincere, from-the-heart, and incredibly realistic sentiments.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Adorable 'Haka baby' dance offers a sweet window into Maori culture

Stop what you're doing and let this awesomeness wash over you.

If you've never seen a Maori haka performed, you're missing out.

The Maori are the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, and their language and customs are an integral part of the island nation. One of the most recognizable Maori traditions outside of New Zealand is the haka, a ceremonial dance or challenge usually performed in a group. The haka represents the pride, strength, and unity of a tribe and is characterized by foot-stamping, body slapping, tongue protrusions, and rhythmic chanting.

Haka is performed at weddings as a sign of reverence and respect for the bride and groom and are also frequently seen before sports competitions, such as rugby matches.

Keep ReadingShow less