J.K. Rowling isn't one to put a lot of faith in doubters.

Before her Harry Potter books sold hundreds of millions of copies worldwide, she had to wade through "loads" of rejection — sometimes from some unfriendly sources. The first time she sent her Harry Potter manuscript to a literary agent, the agent responded with a simple but harsh, "My list is full," and kept the folder Rowling sent her work in.

"I really minded about the folder," Rowling tweeted in March 2015. "Because I had almost no money and had to buy another one."


Numerous best-selling books and eight blockbuster movies later, Ms. Rowling can certainly afford to buy a folder for herself. Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images.

Knowing Rowling's track record of breezing by haters, it's no surprise she encourages fans to do the same.

On Aug. 15, 2015, an Egyptian 16-year-old and self-proclaimed "Potterhead" tweeted at the author, mentioning Rowling's work inspired her to become a writer. In Egypt, however, gender roles have trivialized the girl's passion, she explained.


Rowling responded to the girl's message just minutes after it was tweeted with an inspiring message anyone can appreciate if they've ever faced ridicule for pursuing what they love.


It's definitely not the first time Rowling used the web to send out positive vibes.

With more than 5 million Twitter followers, Rowling has a history of proudly championing social causes on the web.

She's never been one to shy away from heavy-hearted or controversial topics in order to keep the online trolls at bay. She did say, after all, that although "it isn't always fun being a famous woman on Twitter," she "[believes] in standing up to bullies." And boy, has she ever.

From her public (and, in the case below, hilarious) support of marriage equality...


...to shutting down haters trolling her Twitter account over politics in Scotland...


...and blasting misogynistic users who were directing disgusting language her way.


Rowling has truly proven to be the "Queen of Socially Conscious Twitter" (an official title I've just created).

Keep up the empowering work, J.K. — the world is waiting excitedly to retweet.

Upworthy has reached out to Twitter user @Hagar_ElSaeed for comment on her exchange with J.K. Rowling and will update this article upon hearing back.

For some people, every day is Independence Day. For Janis Shinwari, this will be his first 4th of July as an American citizen. And boy, he earned it.

"If I was in Afghanistan—if I didn't come here, I wouldn't be alive now. I would be dead." Shinwari told CNN Heroes in 2018. Shinwari risked his life for nine years serving as a translator for U.S. forces in his native country of Afghanistan. He risked his life everyday knowing that should he be caught by the Taliban, the consequences would be severe. "If the Taliban catch you, they will torture you in front of your kids and families and make a film of you." Shinwari said. "Then [they'll] send it to other translators as a warning message to stop working with the American forces."

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