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J.K. Rowling isn't one to put a lot of faith in doubters.

Before her Harry Potter books sold hundreds of millions of copies worldwide, she had to wade through "loads" of rejection — sometimes from some unfriendly sources. The first time she sent her Harry Potter manuscript to a literary agent, the agent responded with a simple but harsh, "My list is full," and kept the folder Rowling sent her work in.

"I really minded about the folder," Rowling tweeted in March 2015. "Because I had almost no money and had to buy another one."


Numerous best-selling books and eight blockbuster movies later, Ms. Rowling can certainly afford to buy a folder for herself. Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images.

Knowing Rowling's track record of breezing by haters, it's no surprise she encourages fans to do the same.

On Aug. 15, 2015, an Egyptian 16-year-old and self-proclaimed "Potterhead" tweeted at the author, mentioning Rowling's work inspired her to become a writer. In Egypt, however, gender roles have trivialized the girl's passion, she explained.


Rowling responded to the girl's message just minutes after it was tweeted with an inspiring message anyone can appreciate if they've ever faced ridicule for pursuing what they love.


It's definitely not the first time Rowling used the web to send out positive vibes.

With more than 5 million Twitter followers, Rowling has a history of proudly championing social causes on the web.

She's never been one to shy away from heavy-hearted or controversial topics in order to keep the online trolls at bay. She did say, after all, that although "it isn't always fun being a famous woman on Twitter," she "[believes] in standing up to bullies." And boy, has she ever.

From her public (and, in the case below, hilarious) support of marriage equality...


...to shutting down haters trolling her Twitter account over politics in Scotland...


...and blasting misogynistic users who were directing disgusting language her way.


Rowling has truly proven to be the "Queen of Socially Conscious Twitter" (an official title I've just created).

Keep up the empowering work, J.K. — the world is waiting excitedly to retweet.

Upworthy has reached out to Twitter user @Hagar_ElSaeed for comment on her exchange with J.K. Rowling and will update this article upon hearing back.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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gerlalt/Canva

James Earl Jones helped "Sesame Street" prove its pedagogical model for teaching kids the alphabet.

James Earl Jones has one of the most recognizable voices in the entertainment industry and has for decades. Most of us probably heard that deep, resonant voice first as Darth Vader in "Star Wars," or perhaps Mufasa in "The Lion King," but just one or two words are enough to say, "Oh, that's definitely James Earl Jones."

Jones has been acting on stage and in film since the 1960s. He also has the distinction of being the first celebrity guest to be invited to "Sesame Street" during the show's debut season in 1969.

According to Muppet Wiki, clips of Jones counting to 10 and reciting the alphabet were included in unbroadcast pilot episodes and also included in one of the first official television episodes. Funnily enough, Jones originally didn't think the show would last, as he thought kids would be terrified of the muppets. Clearly, that turned out not to be the case.

Jones' alphabet recitation served as a test for the "Sesame Street" pedagogical model, which was meant to inspire interaction from kids rather than just passive absorption. Though to the untrained eye, Jones' slow recitation of the ABCs may seem either plodding or bizarrely hypnotic, there's a purpose to the way it's presented.

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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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