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If I Caught My Kid Making One Of These Videos, I'd Be ... Really Proud, Actually

This important message is brought to you by kids under 18 who give a crap about the future of their country.

NEED MORE?

Well, here are some numbers that might do the trick.

Young voters are a powerful but consistently under-represented voice at the polls. In 2012, voters 18 to 29 made up over 20% of the eligible voting population, but only 15% of them actually voted.


Only half of voters 25 to 44 and a mere 38% of voters 18 to 24 cast their ballots in the 2012 elections. And those numbers are even lower in midterm elections like 2014's — in the 2010 midterms, only 21% of 18-to-24-year-olds voted.

Both groups are voting at rates far lower than in 1964, the year just before the passage of the Voting Rights Act, one of the most effective civil rights laws in the history of the U.S.

The VRA is a perfect example of what's possible when people are pissed off enough not just to vote, but to be united and engaged on things that matter.

I'll be the first to admit that I'm cynical of voting as a way to bring about the change that so many people want and need. Elections have been soiled by corrupt corporations, wealthy individuals, politicians, and even our own Supreme Court.

But I still do it. Because it's really the *least* any of us who have a problem with the way things are should do. And because no matter how f&%#d up federal politics may be, I still believe local and state elections can make a difference in people's lives.

If you're able to vote but weren't planning on it, I hope you'll give it a second thought. There are a lot of folks — kids included — who would do it in your place if they could.

And if you're too young to vote, join these other young people in spreading the message to get out the vote.

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To support this effort and other programs like it, all you have to do is keep doing what you're doing — like shopping for laundry detergent. Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

True

When Jonathan Irons was 16, he was put on trial for burglary and assault with a weapon. According to CBS Sports, Irons was tried as adult, and an all-white jury found him guilty—despite there being no witnesses, no fingerprints, no footprints, and no DNA proving his guilt.

Irons began his 50-year sentence in a Missouri state prison in 1998. Now, 22 years later, he's a free man, largely thanks to the tireless efforts of a WNBA superstar.

Maya Moore is arguably the most decorated professional women's basketball player in the U.S. A first-round draft pick in 2011, she's played for the Minnesota Lynx, where she became a six-time WNBA All-Star, a five-time All-WNBA First Team player, a four-time WNBA champion, and the WNBA Most Valuable Player in 2014.

But before the 2019 season, in the peak of her career, Moore decided to take the year off for a different kind of court battle—one that had wrongfully convicted a young man and doomed him to spend most of his life behind bars. Her decision rocked her sport, and there was no guarantee that sacrificing an entire season to fight for criminal justice reform would bear any fruit.

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