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I Usually Can't Stand Yearly Recap Videos, But The One You're About To See Is Kleenex-Worthy

At the end of every year, the things that seem to stand out are the not-so-great things. This video is a look back on 2014 and the moments that made our hearts swell with oneness.

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2014 was a jam-packed year. But the parts that struck me most were the reminders of the visionaries we lost in 2014, like Shirley Temple, Gabriel García Márquez, Lauren Bacall, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ruby Dee, Robin Williams, and Maya Angelou.

And I enjoyed the following quotes from "Jack" and "Be a Rainbow in Someone Else's Cloud." These quotes were not only perfect memorial choices — they're something worth thinking about at every stage of our lives.



"You know, as we come to the end of this phase of our life, we find ourselves trying to remember the good times and trying to forget the bad times, and we find ourselves thinking about the future. We start to worry, thinking, 'What am I gonna do? Where am I gonna be in 10 years?' But I say to you, 'Hey, look at me!' Please, don't worry so much. Because in the end, none of us have very long on this Earth. Life is fleeting. And if you're ever distressed, cast your eyes to the summer sky when the stars are strung across the velvety night. And when a shooting star streaks through the blackness, turning night into day ... make a wish and think of me. Make your life spectacular. I know I did." — Jack (Robin Williams)

"I bring everyone who has ever been kind to me with me. Black, white, Asian, Spanish-speaking, Native American, gay, straight, everybody. I say, 'Come with me. I'm going on the stage. Come with me. I need you now.' Long dead, you see? So, I don't ever feel I have no help.

I've had rainbows in my clouds. And the thing to do, it seems to me, is to prepare yourself so that you can be a rainbow in somebody else's cloud. Somebody who may not look like you, may not call God the same name you call God, if they call God at all! You see? And may not eat the same dishes prepared the way you do. May not dance your dances. Or speak your language. But be a blessing … to somebody. That's what I think."— Dr. Maya Angelou

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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via Pixabay

Happy pumpkin season.

We celebrate Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. The big focus on that day is the massive feast, football and maybe a little talk about pilgrims and Native Americans breaking bread together.

But, aside from a possible prayer at dinner, are many people focusing on the most essential part of the holiday: being thankful?

Amy Latta, a mother and craft expert, noticed the disconnect between the holiday and its meaning in 2012 so she created a new family tradition, the Thankful Pumpkin. The idea came to her after she went to a pumpkin patch with her son, Noah, who was 3 at the time.

“We need to stop and focus and be intentional about counting our blessings. To help do that in our family, we started the tradition of the Thankful Pumpkin,” she wrote on her blog. “All you need to make one is a pumpkin and a permanent marker and a heart full of gratitude.”

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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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