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The end of the 89th Academy Awards was one for the ages — and that's an understatement.

"Moonlight" writer-director Barry Jenkins accepts the Academy Award for Best Picture. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

"Moonlight's" stunning upset victory over early frontrunner "La La Land" was made even more shocking by the fact that presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway initially awarded the Best Picture trophy to the wrong film. Thinking they'd won, "La La Land's" producers delivered their entire acceptance speeches — only to hand the award off when they realized what had happened.


In many ways, this moment was exactly what Twitter was built for.

The mix-up unleashed a tidal wave of snark, followed by chaos, followed by jubilation — all playing out in real time.

Initially, supporters of "Moonlight" — who were stung that a groundbreaking black queer coming-of-age story would likely be shut out by a conventional Hollywood romance — prepared themselves for disappointment.

Starting with a win for Best Production Design, it seemed like "La La Land" was poised for a clean sweep of the night's biggest awards.

Tweeters of color in particular — including some of the most prominent voices on black Twitter — were less than pleased, especially when "La La Land" appeared to have claimed the night's top prize.

Then it happened. "La La Land" producer Jordan Horowitz stepped up to the mic and announced the mistake. "Moonlight" had actually won.

At first, it seemed like it might be a terrible prank.

But pretty quickly, it became clear Horowitz wasn't kidding. All hell broke loose.

News organizations had to adjust their breaking news alerts.

Shock and disbelief reverberated across social media.

When the confusion died down, it became clear the seemingly impossible had happened.

"Moonlight" had won Best Picture. For real.

And the celebration began.

The shocking upset victory was hailed as a long-overdue win for marginalized groups of artists...

...and for moviegoers who have waited just as long to see themselves on screen.

Many saw a deeper symbolism in the chaos and confusion.

Others praised the "La La Land" team for reacting to an enormously difficult moment with grace.

Most, however, were simply thrilled.

This victory for "Moonlight" may or may not represent a sea change in the way the Oscars does business.

Time will tell whether the Academy is truly committed to rewarding greater diversity in film. And "La La Land" deserves all the awards it won and critical recognition it's received.

But last night, a small, gorgeous, unsparing, nuanced movie about the life of a gay black kid in Miami, written and directed by artists of color, took home the top prize. What's more? It deserved it.

Now, more than ever, that matters.

via Jess Martini / Tik Tok

This article originally appeared on 01.27.21


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