How Adidas used emojis to shut down homophobes on its Instagram.

Hats off to Adidas.

Adidas celebrated Valentine's Day this year by posting an ad featuring a same-sex couple (presumably) sharing a smooch.

Because, yes, it's 2016. And queer couples exist, too. Kudos, Adidas.


But just like most things on the Internet these days, some folks began trolling the ad in the comment section on Instagram, expressing their disdain for same-sex attraction. Because, yes, it's 2016, and unfortunately homophobia is still alive and well.


Luckily, Adidas defended its decision to share the pic.

Adidas was not having it with the homophobic reactions. And the sportswear brand handled it ... well, pretty brilliantly.

After one commenter shamed the company and threatened to abandon the brand for Nike, Adidas hit back using its emoji A-game.


Yes, that's Adidas telling a potential (and homophobic) customer sayonara by using a waving hand and kiss goodbye. (Because, yes, it's 2016, and one emoji is worth a thousand words.)

It's ironic that this displeased commenter decided to ditch Adidas for its biggest competitor.

Because Nike's not having it with homophobia, either.

After famed boxer Manny Pacquiao said disgusting things about gay people earlier this week (let's just say it had to do with animals — I'll spare you the details), Nike dropped the athlete without hesitation. The boxer had partnered with the brand for more than eight years.

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

"We find Manny Pacquiao's comments abhorrent," the company said in a statement. "Nike strongly opposes discrimination of any kind and has a long history of supporting and standing up for the rights of the LGBT community."

Nike's and Adidas' inclusiveness on this issue aren't anomalies, either — their take on diversity is becoming the standard. As a 2015 study by Google discovered, more and more brands are speaking out about accepting the queer community, and it shows in their advertising.

This trend, of course, is led by a growing tolerance of same-sex relationships in recent decades among mainstream Americans (in case you've been living under a rock).

The world will see less and less homophobic trolls in comment sections as years pass, I imagine.

But for now, we have moments like these, thanks to brands like Adidas (and a great use of emojis).

Maybe think twice before trolling a brand's comment section with backward ideas? Just a thought. ;)

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