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Do you have a bunch of expired or unused prescription medications scattered throughout your house?

Maybe you toss them in the trash or maybe you just hoard them in an unused drawer. Whatever the case, it's something most of us have done (myself included) at one time or another. Well, as you may have guessed, in some cases, that's not exactly the ideal course of action.

Certain drugs, especially narcotic pain relievers and other controlled substances, can cause major harm to others if not properly disposed. Improperly discarded medications have the potential to be found by people — adults and children — for whom they weren't prescribed, creating the likelihood of abuse, such as addiction or even overdose.


Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images.

In February 2016, Walgreens announced plans to roll out kiosks that will let customers safely discard unused or expired medication. They'll be installing more than 500 kiosks.

Walgreens announced the plan in response to the opioid epidemic and the dramatic increase in deaths related to opioid pain relievers and heroin over the past 16 years. In addition to that, naloxone, an opioid antidote, will be made available in more than 35 states across the country without a prescription.

A safe disposal kiosk is seen here during an event unveiling a multistate program to combat opioid abuse in the U.S. Photo by Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images.

Addressing the epidemic has been a priority for both President Obama and members of Congress.

In February, Representative Robert Dold (R-IL) introduced legislation to combat opioid-related overdose deaths. The bill, part of the larger Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 400 to 5. In July, the bill was signed into law by President Obama. The focus of Rep. Dold's bill is to expand access to naloxone to first responders.

Rep. Robert Dold (R-IL). Photo by Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images.

While there are a number of other places that accept unused prescriptions, such as police and fire departments, putting them in pharmacies make it much more convenient.

"Yes, it's a safe place to bring unused medications," Illinois State Senator Michael Connelly told the Naperville Sun about the rollout at nearby Walgreens Deerfield headquarters. "But more importantly, it's a constant reminder when you come to pick up your prescription that there's a problem out there, and that you, too, have to be involved in safely disposing of medications."

"Across all of America, 47,000 people have died because of drug overdoses, Walgreens Boots Alliance co-COO Alex Gourlay told CBS. "It’s a real issue that we want to play our part in controlling and hoping to solve."

Bottles of prescription medications. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

There are firm steps you can take to reduce the chances of your drugs winding up in the wrong hands — and it's potentially lifesaving.

If you're not sure if there's a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) authorized unused medication drop location near you, you can visit the agency's website or call 1-800-882-9539.

If for some reason you absolutely must dispose of medicine in your household trash, the Federal Drug Administration recommends mixing medicines with "unpalatable substances such as dirt, kitty litter, or used coffee grounds," place the mixture in a sealed plastic bag, and throw the bag in the trash. Some medicines, however, are safe to simply flush down the sink or toilet — you can find a list on the FDA website.

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She bought the perfect wedding dress that went viral on TikTok. It was only $3.75

Lynch is part of a growing line of newlyweds going against the regular wedding tradition of spending loads of money.

Making a priceless memory

Upon first glance, one might think that Jillian Lynch wore a traditional (read: expensive) dress to her wedding. After all, it did look glamorous on her. But this 32-year-old bride has a secret superpower: thrifting.

Lynch posted her bargain hunt on TikTok, sharing that she had been perusing thrift shops in Ohio for four days in a row, with the actual ceremony being only a month away. Lynch then displays an elegant ivory-colored Camila Coelho dress. Fitting perfectly, still brand new and with the tags on it, no less.

You can find that exact same dress on Revolve for $220. Lynch bought it for only $3.75.
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This article originally appeared on 08.21.18


Addie Rodriguez was supposed to take the field with her dad during a high school football game, where he, along with other dads, would lift her onto his shoulders for a routine. But Addie's dad was halfway across the country, unable to make the event.

Her father is Abel Rodriguez, a veteran airman who, after tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, was training at Travis Air Force Base in California, 1,700 miles from his family in San Antonio at the time.

"Mom missed the memo it was parent day, and the reason her mom missed the memo was her dad left Wednesday," said Alexis Perry-Rodriguez, Addie's mom. She continued, "It was really heartbreaking to see your daughter standing out there being the only one without their father, knowing why he's away. It's not just an absentee parent. He's serving our country."

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1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.