He was supposed to kill these 2 bear cubs. He saved them instead. Now he might lose his job.

Two adorable bear cubs are at the center of a controversy after a firefighter tried to rescue them.

Image by Don Bonner/YouTube.


The Canadian firefighter was under orders to kill the bear cubs, but he decided to rescue them instead. And now he might be out of a job.

According to the CBC, here's how it went down:

B.C. conservation officer Bryce Casavant has been suspended without pay for refusing to kill two black bear cubs near Port Hardy after their mother was killed for repeatedly raiding a freezer full of meat and salmon.

Despite an order to kill the cubs too, Casavant took them to a veterinary hospital. They are now at a recovery centre run by the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association in Errington, which like Port Hardy is on Vancouver Island.

Jordan and Athena (the bear cubs) are now safe and under evaluation at the recovery center.


That face though.

But meanwhile, Casavant is suspended from the fire department and under investigation for disobeying orders.

Deciding whether to euthanize an animal, especially a very young one, can be agonizing.

Sometimes euthanizing can be the most humane course of action, especially if an animal is unable to hack it in the wild or if they can't live stress-free alongside humans.

But that's where it gets complicated: Unless you try to rehabilitate the animal, it's really, really difficult to know how they'll behave. Often times, animals that seem like hopeless cases can go on to live long, fulfilling lives.

In this case, and thanks to Casavant's quick thinking, these two bear cubs will have a chance to prove they can survive on their own.

As of July 9, 2015, a petition to get Casavant his job back has already been signed over 85,000 times.

It has even gotten some celebrity attention:


And possibly because of the ruckus — though Casavant remains under investigation — his pay has been reinstated. That's good news.

Meanwhile, no one knows what else is in store for Jordan and Athena.

Right now they're busy winning the hearts of Canada in videos like the one below.

And this much is clear: Because of Casavant, these adorable bear cubs will have a chance to grow up and prove themselves.

And a man shouldn't lose his job over trying to do the right thing.

The difference between a politician and a public servant may be a matter of semantics, but when it comes to getting legislation passed that actually helps people, the contrast is stark.

Texas Representative James Talarico is on a mission to get his constituents the life-saving medicine they need. The 31-year-old lawmaker has just introduced legislation that would cap the price of insulin—a medicine people with type 1 diabetes need to live, which has become unaffordable for many—at $50 a month.

The mission is personal for Talarico, as he nearly died three years ago when he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

He shared his story on Twitter:

"In May 2018, I was a healthy 28-year-old running for the Texas House. I decided to walk the entire length of my district and hold town halls along the way. I hike Big Bend every year, so I wasn't concerned about a 25 mile walk...

But halfway through the walk, I began feeling nauseous and fatigued. Before the town hall in Hutto, I vomited in the bathroom."

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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