Heroes

He Says His Name Is Shawn, But I’m Pretty Sure It’s Thomas Edison Jr. Jr. Jr.

These clever inventors are killing two birds — staving off a global energy crisis and solving the problem of having to find an outlet to plug in your cellphone every half-hour — with one stone. OK, one of those birds is bigger than the other. But I repeat: These guys seem set to knock 'em dead.

He Says His Name Is Shawn, But I’m Pretty Sure It’s Thomas Edison Jr. Jr. Jr.
Courtesy of Maketto

Maketto, a communal marketplace located in Washington D.C. that combines retail, restaurant and cafe experiences.

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As the cold, dark days of winter carry on, restaurants all over the country are struggling to keep patrons coming in the proverbial door. Despite expensive and elaborate upgrades to help make restaurant dining safer, the one-two punch of the pandemic and frigid temperatures has done a number on restaurants' cash flow. Already, 17% of all restaurants in the United States have permanently closed since the start of the pandemic.

The National Restaurant Association described the industry as being "in an economic free-fall" in their plea to the U.S. House of Representatives, for some economic relief. If no help is received, they expect 58% of restaurants to continue furloughs and layoffs in the first quarter of the year.

There are, however, some big businesses doing their part to support the restaurant industry in its time of need. Capital One, for example, is taking a multi-pronged approach to helping the restaurant industry. One of those initiatives is providing over 30 restaurants nationwide with funding to safely and successfully winterize their outdoor dining options so they can stay open and keep their occupancy up.

"Restaurants are anchors in the communities in which we live and work, which is why we're providing them support so they can better access the tools they need to survive these difficult winter months," says Monica Bauder, Head of Cardholder Access at Capital One. "At Capital One, the dining industry has always been an important community to us and we want to continue to find ways to help them through this difficult time."

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Humans and dogs have a long, historic relationship that plays out in special, individual bonds the world over. Countless people have found themselves unable to resist the adorableness of a puppy they were just going to "look at," and ended up in a mutually adoring relationship. Countless kids have grown up with a loyal canine companion who is always there for them and makes up a big part of their childhood memories.

This bond is no more apparent than when a dog and its favorite human get separated and then reunited. Some dogs express excitement when they see pretty much anyone, but when a pup has a person, there's nothing like it.

Just look at how happy this lost doggo is to see her owner—and vice versa.

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Courtesy of Maketto

Maketto, a communal marketplace located in Washington D.C. that combines retail, restaurant and cafe experiences.

True

As the cold, dark days of winter carry on, restaurants all over the country are struggling to keep patrons coming in the proverbial door. Despite expensive and elaborate upgrades to help make restaurant dining safer, the one-two punch of the pandemic and frigid temperatures has done a number on restaurants' cash flow. Already, 17% of all restaurants in the United States have permanently closed since the start of the pandemic.

The National Restaurant Association described the industry as being "in an economic free-fall" in their plea to the U.S. House of Representatives, for some economic relief. If no help is received, they expect 58% of restaurants to continue furloughs and layoffs in the first quarter of the year.

There are, however, some big businesses doing their part to support the restaurant industry in its time of need. Capital One, for example, is taking a multi-pronged approach to helping the restaurant industry. One of those initiatives is providing over 30 restaurants nationwide with funding to safely and successfully winterize their outdoor dining options so they can stay open and keep their occupancy up.

"Restaurants are anchors in the communities in which we live and work, which is why we're providing them support so they can better access the tools they need to survive these difficult winter months," says Monica Bauder, Head of Cardholder Access at Capital One. "At Capital One, the dining industry has always been an important community to us and we want to continue to find ways to help them through this difficult time."

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Tim Storms says he first realized he had a wide vocal range when he sang songs at a Christian camp as a kid. As he's gotten older, that range has only widened as his voice has gotten deeper.

Considering the fact that he's held the Guinness World Record for singing the lowest note for nearly a decade (an honor he had to reclaim in 2012 after winning it the first time in 2008), you'd expect Storms' speaking voice to sound like James Earl Jones or something. But to hear him speak, you'd never guess how low his voice can really go.

To give you an idea of how low we're talking, hit the bottom note of a piano, then imagine adding another piano's worth of keys below that note. Storms' lowest notes are so low, they're nearly impossible for our ears to hear—instead, they feel like the rumble of a subwoofer. The official record-breaking low vocal note was registered at G-7 (0.189 Hz), which means nothing to most of us, but it's really freaking low.

The guy can really sing, though. Check him out singing "Lonesome Road":

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Via Olivia Newton-John / Instagram

A recent airing of "Grease" on the BBC resulted in a backlash online with some calling for it to be banned from further showings.

Critics cited the scene where John Travolta's character Danny Zuko repeatedly tries to put a move on Sandy Osbourne, played by Olivia-Newton John, but she pushes him away.

They also called the film homophobic because the dance contest is for straight couples only.

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