11 things you can do to have a Thanksgiving in the true spirit of the holiday.

This Thanksgiving, let your belly be full of love and gratitude ... and pie.

The first time a bunch of immigrants and locals got together in the U.S. to eat some home-cooked fowl, it was 1621.

And, according to some historians, it was more like a big, loose, last-minute festival than a fancy sit-down dinner.

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We rarely hear the voices of actual small business owners. Syd's is one to remember.

This is a warm-up-your-heart local business story about how local businesses warm up the hearts of our neighborhoods.

This is Syd. And his sandwich shop.

Syd Wayman launched his shop after winning a business plan competition. His cheesesteaks and hoagies were making foodies' top-10 lists and providing jobs to people in Crown Heights, a historically low-income neighborhood in Brooklyn.

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CNBC's The Profit

This summer, I attended a totally unusual baby party.

Instead of the typical banter about burping and baby food, this one had less of that and more of ... well, prospective parents gathering to discuss whether or not it still makes sense to have kids these days.

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Heroes

Nocturnal activity, yearning for love, melodrama? Classic tree-puberty.

Seeing trees covered in flowers has always been my favorite part of spring. Now it seems even more delightful.

Could you imagine going through puberty every single year? That's what springtime is like for trees.

It's a time when trees go through their own adolescence. And that means all kinds of awkward changes.

The science behind their yearly blooming is pretty fascinating. If you learned, or assumed, that trees turn green and put out flowers just because it's nice and warm again, you were not alone. That's what I thought, too! But ... you and I were both mistaken. The video from The Atlantic below breaks it all down for us.

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