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Ever heard of ‘right-to-work’? Well, about that…

So what happens when states pass right-to-work laws? Ahem.

Ever heard of ‘right-to-work’? Well, about that…

While this video was made specifically about Missouri, it's something that should be seen in every state in the country where so-called "right-to-work" laws currently exist or are being considered at the ballot box.

It sounds appealing, right? I mean, who doesn't want a right to work, right?


So I guess the question is, who actually benefits from these laws — the people or the 1%? I'll let you take a look at this fact-checked video and then make a decision.

Fact: In right-to-work states, the average wage is $1,500 lower than in free-bargaining states.

Fact: In states that have right-to-work laws on the books, benefits like health care, pensions, and college tuition are less accessible than in free-bargaining states.

Fact: In states where right-to-work laws are in effect, corporate profits go up, while middle-class wages go down.

FACT CHECK TIME! There are several sources for the claims here.

1. An average worker in a "right-to-work" state makes $1,500 less per year. This checks out at Economic Policy Institute in multiple places, including "Average worker in 'right-to-work' state earns $1,500 less each year" as well as "The compensation penalty of 'right-to-work' laws."

2. Health care and pension benefits are less in right-to-work states. See above.

3. Union jobs provide a whole slew of things that nonunion jobs don't — from benefits to wages to time off. Again, Economic Policy Institute has the facts on that in "How unions help all workers."

4. If you need even more sources to back up the facts here, try the AFL-CIO, SEIU, and WrongforEveryone.com.

"In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, such as 'right to work.' It is a law to rob us of our civil rights and job rights. Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining by which unions have improved wages and working conditions of everyone. … Wherever these laws have been passed, wages are lower, job opportunities are fewer and there are no civil rights." — Martin Luther King, 1961
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Photo by R.D. Smith on Unsplash

Gem is living her best life.

If you've ever dreamed of spontaneously walking out the door and treating yourself a day of pampering at a spa without even telling anyone, you'll love this doggo who is living your best life.

According to CTV News, a 5-year-old shepherd-cross named Gem escaped from her fenced backyard in Winnipeg early Saturday morning and ended up at the door of Happy Tails Pet Resort & Spa, five blocks away. An employee at the spa saw Gem at the gate around 6:30 a.m. and was surprised when they noticed her owners were nowhere to be seen.

"They were looking in the parking lot and saying, 'Where's your parents?'" said Shawn Bennett, one of the co-owners of the business.

The employee opened the door and Gem hopped right on in, ready and raring to go for her day of fun and relaxation.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."