David Lynch has become the world's favorite new weatherman during the COVID-19 lockdown
via Danielle Bacher

David Lynch completely changed television as we know it in the '90s with his quirky, avant-garde Twin Peaks. He's directed some head-scratching masterpieces (Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive and Eraserhead) and a few mainstream hits like The Elephant Man and The Straight Story.

Then there was the beautiful disaster known as Dune.

Now, while Los Angeles is on lockdown, he's doing his part to help his neighbors with a morning weather report, something he's loved doing for years.




Things got dramatic as rain headed toward Los Angeles on Monday:

Weather Report 5/18/20 www.youtube.com



On Tuesday, things began to clear up.


Weather Report 5/19/20 www.youtube.com


This morning, Lynch reported "beautiful blue skies, golden sunshine. Very still:"


Weather Report 5/20/20 www.youtube.com


This isn't Lynch's first foray into meteorology. Back in the early aughts he gave a weather report on the Indie 103.1 morning show. As you can see from the clip below, Lynch's delivery and L.A.'s weather haven't changed much.


david lynch weather www.youtube.com

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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